lust

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lust

A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term for intense sexual desire for another person or, less commonly, an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
With four wickets going down for 14 runs inside 11 overs, as Middlesex slipped to 206 for eight, it took a 47-run ninth wicket stand between Dexter and Roland-Jones to reduce Warwickshire's first innings lead - with Roland-Jones swinging his bat lustily to reach 32 from 30 balls.
But when the results were announced the pro-Pacquiao crowd booed lustily and tried to drown out Mayweather's post-fight comments over the public address system.
Locally it will be celebrated lustily, not least at Thursday's Opening Ceremony party.
Hastings drove to long on and 75 for two had become 91 for nine before Mark Wood swung lustily to make 18 before he was bowled by Rankin.
Quite 1,000 people had congregated on the footwalk at the end of Castle Street and when the Minister of Munitions made his appearance they evaded the police cordon, broke across the roadway, and cheered lustily as Mr Lloyd George took his seat in the motor.
After intermission, the audience was invited to join the Chorus in singing the Ralph Vaughn Williams setting of "Old Hundred,'' which they did lustily and with great effect in that vaulted space.
The band gave their all on stage and the crowd responded ecstatically, singing along lustily from start to finish.
Of course, it may be looking lustily at Pakistan for marketing its merchandise and getting some goods and raw materials, particularly quality rock for cement manufacturing, from here at cheaper rates for its construction industry.
The crowd cheered lustily as he delivered his punchlines.
In our honour a couple of Granada footballers donned Beatles wings and sang lustily, finishing off by chanting 'New-cas-el, New-cas-el.
Choruses of "Stand up if you love the darts" were lustily and frequently sung by an exuberant crowd predominantly comprising British expatriates, while Planet Funk's infectious pop anthem "Chase the Sun", which has become the signature tune of darts in its hotbed of Great Britain, had everyone jigging and clapping along during breaks in play.
Then I could join lustily in with the singing, and not be too upset about the name on the front of the programme, whom I wouldn't know anyway.