lusitropy


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lus·it·ro·py

(lūs-it'rō-pē),
Relaxation functions of cardiac muscle and chambers.

lus·it·ro·py

(lū-sit'trŏ-pē)
Relaxation functions of cardiac muscle and chambers.

lusitropy

(loo-si′trŏ-pē) [Gr. lusis, variant of lysis + Gr. tropē, a turning]
The relaxation of cardiac muscle.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Impact of restrictive physiology on intrinsic diastolic right ventricular function and lusitropy in children and adolescents after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.
Traditionally, understanding of cardiovascular physiology starts with widely used but non-quantitative cardiocentric concepts such as inotropy and lusitropy, the relaxation properties of the heart in diastole.
This action is similar to positive lusitropy induced by ISO, which is known to result from stimulation of SR [Ca.
In athlete's heart, this is reflected in better inotropy, lusitropy, and augmented cardiac pumping capacity (Katz and Lorell, 2000), which are clearly an advantage.
Internists, family physicians, and even cardiologists who aren't echocardiographers find baffling the terms we routinely use to describe diastolic dysfunction: impaired relaxation, restrictive filling, lusitropy, and here's one that really messes people up--pseudonormalization.