lupin


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lupin

see lupinus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 shows the ability of the processed white lupin to retain considerable amounts of both macro- and micronutrient elements.
Lupins can suffer from a fungal disease that causes dieback and leaf browning and when this gets a hold, it's hard to control.
The scientists found that they could replace about 40% of the fishmeal in the prawns' diet with lupin meal, but above that there was a decline in prawn growth by up to 30%.
The raw lupin seeds were soaked in distilled water for 24 hours and the volume of the lupin seeds was estimated before and after soaking by determination of displaced water.
Growing lupins in the UK to replace imported soya is a really excellent good news story - for consumers, farmers and wildlife," said Mr Burgess.
Together, lupins and triticale combinein such balanced food products as "pasta with a plus.
Both experiments received an added N input from lupin residues prior to the amendment of the [sup.
This year, livestock farmer Andrew Ball, at Ladbroke Grove, Southam in Warwickshire, started growing lupins and soya for the first time, with a five-acre field of each.
Russell lupins were the most famous strain ever produced, though better weather-resistance and longer flowering is claimed for more modern kinds such as Band of Nobles and Sky Rocket, both of which can reach 1.
Aberystwyth University last year embarked on a research project looking at lupins, which are a highprotein, high-energy, nitrogen-fixing grain legume with a protein and oil composition that can compete effectively with imported soya.
To protect the allergic consumer, it is necessary to develop detection techniques that can identify lupin in foods.
They wish to expand the clinical studies of lupins into different populations such as Oman.