lunatic


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lu·na·tic

(lū'nă-tik),
Obsolete term for a mentally ill person.
[see lunacy]

lunatic

Medspeak
A term obsolete in the working medical parlance for a mentally deranged person.

lunatic

(lu'na-tik) [L. luna, moon]
An obsolete term for a person with an unsound mind.
See: lunacy
References in classic literature ?
Jo glanced at the sheet and saw a pleasing illustration composed of a lunatic, a corpse, a villian, and a viper.
I didn't know how to go about satisfying it, because I knew that the testimony of men wouldn't serve -- my reason would say they were lunatics, and throw out their evidence.
Rochester flung me behind him: the lunatic sprang and grappled his throat viciously, and laid her teeth to his cheek: they struggled.
There is nothing of the imbecile or degenerate in his features or expression, as is usually true in similar cases, where some lunatic escapes into the woods and by living in filth and nakedness wins the title of wild man among the peasants of the neighborhood.
There are but few houses close at hand, one being a very large house only recently added to and formed into a private lunatic asylum.
People in general thought him a lunatic, and blamed his Reform Club friends for having accepted a wager which betrayed the mental aberration of its proposer.
The fellow thought he was a lunatic at large and made an unsuccessful attempt to shut him into the taproom.
At most, they would take him to the lunatic asylum as "the King of Spain" if he should go very mad.
It was past a question now that Faria was not a lunatic, and the way in which he had achieved the discovery, which had given rise to the suspicion of his madness, increased Edmond's admiration of him; but at the same time Dantes could not believe that the deposit, supposing it had ever existed, still existed; and though he considered the treasure as by no means chimerical, he yet believed it was no longer there.
The poor lunatic, it seems probable, had cherished a delusion that his haughty mistress sat in state, unharmed herself by the pestilential influence, which, as by enchantment, she scattered round about her.
de Bellegarde continued, "that I ought to come and remove the impression that I had taken such great pains to produce upon you; the impression that I am a lunatic.
continued Paulucci, desperately, apparently unable to restrain himself, "the man who advised the Drissa camp- I see no alternative but the lunatic asylum or the gallows