lumen

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lumen

 [lu´men] (L.)
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ, as a blood vessel or the intestine.
2. the SI unit of rate of flow of radiant energy, specifically that of the visible spectrum. adj., adj lu´minal.

lu·men

, pl.

lu·mi·na

,

lu·mens

(lū'men, -min-ă, -menz),
1. The space in the interior of a hollow tubular structure (for example, artery or intestine).
2. The unit of luminous flux; the luminous flux emitted in a unit solid angle of 1 steradian by a uniform point source of light having a luminous intensity of 1 candela.
3. The volume enclosed within the membranes of a mitochondrion or of the endoplasmic reticulum.
4. The bore of a catheter or hollow needle.
[L. light, window]

lumen

/lu·men/ (loo´men) pl. lu´mina   [L.]
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ.
2. the SI unit of luminous flux; it is the light emitted in a unit solid angle by a uniform point source with luminous intensity of one candela.lu´minal

residual lumen  the remains of Rathke's pouch, between the distal and intermediate parts of the pituitary gland.

lumen

(lo͞o′mən)
n. pl. lu·mens or lu·mina (-mə-nə)
1. Anatomy The inner open space or cavity of a tubular organ, as of a blood vessel or an intestine.
2. Biology The interior of a membrane-bound compartment or organelle in a cell.
3. Abbr. lmPhysics The SI unit of luminous flux, equal to the amount of light per unit time passing through a solid angle of one steradian from a light source of one candela intensity radiating equally in all directions. See Table at measurement.

lu′men·al, lu′min·al adj.

lumen

[lo̅o̅′mən] pl. lumina, lumens
Etymology: L, light
1 a tubular space or the channel within any organ or structure of the body.
2 a unit of luminous flux that equals the flux emitted in a unit solid angle by a point source of one candle intensity. lumenal, luminal, adj.

lu·men

(lm), pl. lumina (lū'mĕn, -mi-nă)
1. The space in the interior of a tubular structure, such as an artery or intestine.
2. The unit of luminous flux; the luminous flux emitted in a unit solid angle of 1 steradian by a uniform point source of light having a luminous intensity of 1 candela.
[L. light, window]

lumen

The inside of any tube, such as a blood vessel, an air passage (bronchus) or the intestine.

lumen

any cavity enclosed within a cell, or structure, such as the lumen of the gut.

Lumen

The inner cavity or canal of a tube-shaped organ, such as the bowel.
Mentioned in: Amebiasis

lumen

space within hollow tube, e.g. cross-sectional area of an artery

lumen

1. SI unit of luminous flux. It is equal to the flux emitted within a unit solid angle of one steradian by a point source with a luminous intensity of one candela. Symbol: lm. 2. The space in the interior of a tubular organ, such as an artery. See luminous flux; quantity of light; lux; SI unit.
Table L4 Approximate luminance (in cd/m2) of some objects
sun109
car headlight107
incandescent lamp (tungsten)106-107
fluorescent lamp104-105
clear sky at noon104
cloudy sky at noon103
shady street by day103-104
full moon103
book print under artificial light>102
photopic vision>10
street illumination1-10−1
mesopic vision10-10−3
cloudless night sky with full moon10−2
scotopic vision<10−3
moonless and cloudless night sky10−3-10−6

lu·men

, pl. lumina (lūmĕn, -mi-nă)
1. Space in interior of a hollow tubular structure (e.g., artery or intestine).
2. The bore of a catheter or hollow needle.
[L. light, window]

lumen (loo´mən),

n the space within a tube structure, such as a blood vessel, tube, or duct.

lumen

pl. lumina [L.]
1. the cavity or channel within a tube or tubular organ, as a blood vessel or the intestine.
2. the SI unit of light flux.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the Bard Endo Lumenal Gastroplication procedure does not require an incision, it allows for faster recovery time than standard surgical procedures currently used to treat GERD and an almost immediate improved quality of life for patients.
Protein therapeutics delivered as oral lumenal therapies offer distinct advantages over systemically delivered proteins because they are directly and more readily delivered to the site of action, which may lead to a significant therapeutic effect and an improved safety profile.
Clinical and functional effects of a deletion in a COOHterminal lumenal loop of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor.
Protein therapeutics delivered as oral lumenal therapies offer distinct advantages over systemically delivered proteins, since they are directly and more readily delivered to the site of action.
This may explain why lesions with the greatest lumenal stenoses, which cause chronic ischemia, are usually the more stable lesions with respect to plaque rupture.
Because it can be removed, physicians can use the Alveolus stent to apply temporary and minimally invasive treatments for patients with benign lumenal strictures.