lumbricus


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lumbricus

 [lum´brĭ-kus] (pl. lum´brici) (L.)
1. the earthworm.
2. old term for ascaris.

lum·bri·cus

(lŭm'bri-kŭs),
1. Synonym(s): lumbricoid (1)
2. Obsolete name for Ascaris lumbricoides.
[L. earthworm]

lumbricus

/lum·bri·cus/ (lum-bri´kus) pl. lumbri´ci   [L.]
1. the earthworm.
2. old term for ascaris.

lumbricus

pl. lumbrici [L.]
1. the earthworm.
2. ascaris.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine if the conversion of the mercuric ion in soil to a water insoluble salt would reduce the soil bioavailability of Hg to earthworms, worm boxes with Hg2+ contaminated soils were treated with either sodium hydrogen phosphate or sodium sulfate before the addition of Lumbricus worms.
Lumbricus invasions substantially alter forest floor habitats, and it is possible they influence Hermit Thrush nesting locations and territory densities.
Experiment carried out at the University of Lubiana, Slovenia in 1987-1988 with Californian worms (Latin name is: Lumbricus Teresticus) shows that the weight of living Californian worms is greater than of the same dead ones; gravitational force of the cosmic space is stronger on the living worms than on the same dead ones.
He says if their powers were used properly, lumbricus terrestris could be the environmental trouble-shooters of the next Millennium.
We have about 20 types of worm native to Britain which live at depths down to 7ft in the case of Lumbricus terrestris and in everything from soil to manure heaps, as in the case of the brandling, Eisenia foetida.
Beesley L, Dickinson N (2011) Carbon and trace element fluxes in the pore water of an urban soil following greenwaste compost, woody and biochar amendments, inoculated with the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.
63 mg/day growth rate of the invasive earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus, a species known to have significant impacts on native forests.
Kennette D, Hendershot W, Tomlin A, Sauve S (2002) Uptake of trace metals by the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L.
Five composite samples of common species individuals were composed (Table 1): epigeic species Dendrobaena octaedra (Savigny, 1826) and Lumbricus rubellus (Hoffmeister 1843), endogeic species Arorrectodea rosea (Savigny, 1826) and Aporrectodea caliginosa (Savigny, 1826), anecic species Lumbricus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758).