lumbosacral


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Related to lumbosacral: Lumbosacral enlargement

lumbosacral

 [lum″bo-sa´kr'l]
pertaining to the lumbar and sacral region, or to the lumbar vertebrae and sacrum.

lum·bo·sa·cral

(lŭm'bō-sā'krăl),
Relating to the lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum.
Synonym(s): sacrolumbar

lumbosacral

/lum·bo·sa·cral/ (-sa´kral) pertaining to the loins and sacrum.

lumbosacral

(lŭm′bō-sā′krəl)
adj.
Relating to the lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum.

lumbosacral

[lum′bōsā′krəl]
Etymology: L, lumbus, loin, sacrum, sacred
pertaining to the lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum. Also sacrolumbar.

lumbosacral

adjective Referring to the lumbar and sacral regions of the lower back.

lum·bo·sa·cral

(lŭm'bō-sā'krăl)
Relating to the lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum.
Synonym(s): sacrolumbar.

lumbosacral

Pertaining to the region of the LUMBAR vertebrae and the curved central bone at the back of the pelvis (SACRUM).

Lumbosacral

Referring to the lower part of the backbone or spine.
Mentioned in: Sciatica

lumbosacral

pertaining to the lumbar and sacral region, or to the lumbar vertebrae and sacrum.

lumbosacral instability
see lumbosacral stenosis (below).
lumbosacral intumescence
the thicker portion of the spinal cord from which the roots of the lumbosacral plexus originate, corresponding to the caudal, cervical lumbar and the sacral spinal segments.
lumbosacral luxation
may result from trauma; common in dogs and cats. Neurological deficits result from injury to spinal nerves, and parenchymal hemorrhage and edema in spinal cord segments distant from the site.
lumbosacral plexus
a network made up of the caudal lumbar and sacral spinal nerves giving rise to the femoral, obturator, cranial gluteal, caudal gluteal, sciatic and pudendal nerves; innervates the perineum and muscles of the pelvic limb.
lumbosacral plexus injury
severe trauma to the hindlimbs may cause injury to the lumbosacral plexus, causing femoral and sciatic nerve deficits (inability to bear weight, extend or flex the stifle, dropped hock, and knuckling onto the digits).
lumbosacral spondylopathy
see lumbosacral stenosis (below).
lumbosacral stenosis
a reduction in diameter of the spinal canal at the level of the lumbosacral articulation may be caused by congenital anomalies of the vertebrae or acquired lesions. Weakness, pain and paresthesia with self-mutilation of the pelvic limbs and tail are clinical signs in dogs. Occurs as a congenital anomaly in some smaller dog breeds, and as an acquired defect in larger breeds, particularly the German shepherd dog.
lumbosacral syndrome
lesions involving the lumbosacral tumescence or the lumbosacral nerve roots. Signs include flaccid paresis or paralysis of pelvic limbs, paresthesia and sensory loss in the pelvic limbs, anal sphincter, tail, bladder and urethral sphincter, depressed or absent postural reactions in the pelvic limbs, and urine retention with passive incontinence. See also lumbosacral stenosis and lumbosacral plexus injury (above), cauda equina neuritis.
References in periodicals archive ?
76] published the first in vivo evidence of the biomechanical effects of two common therapeutic exercise approaches for patients with low back pain, with respect to efficient spinal stabilization and implications for lumbosacral load transfer.
In a living population, MRI appears to be a reasonable alternative for determining the level of the DS and anatomy of the lumbosacral region.
1994a) Lumbosacral movement in the sit-and-reach and in Cailliet's protective-hamstring stretch.
Expression was lowest in the anencephalic case (MV1); higher in the 2 cases with ventriculomegaly, "lemon-shaped head", and missing closure of the neural tube in the lumbosacral region (MV4 and MV13).
Posner observed that Walker was suffering from recurring blood clots in her right leg and a pinched lumbosacral nerve root.
The indifferent electrode was placed at the lumbosacral region with the patient in supine position.
X-rays that deliver less than half a rad each include films of the anteriorposterior pelvis, lumbosacral spine, thoracic spine, and periapical or lateral views.
He was born with lumbosacral agenesis, a rare disease which means that he has seven vertebrae missing and no lower spinal column.
Of the 200,000 to 300,000 lumbosacral spinal surgeries performed each year, up to 40% fail, and many patients with failed surgeries undergo SCS surgery.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbosacral region detected extensive metastatic disease to the vertebral and iliac bones (figure).
Proximal neuropathy, sometimes called lumbosacral plexus neuropathy, femoral neuropathy, or diabetic amyotrophy, starts with pain in either the thighs, hips, buttocks, or legs, usually on one side of the body.
Back and extremity examination revealed exquisite tenderness over the lumbosacral spine and associated leg pain with straight leg testing.