luciferin


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luciferin

(lo͞o-sĭf′ər-ĭn)
n.
A chemical substance present in the cells of bioluminescent organisms, such as fireflies, that produces an almost heatless, bluish-green light when oxidized under the catalytic effects of luciferase and ATP.

luciferin

A class of light-emitting biological pigments that serve as substrate for luciferase (EC 1.13.12.7) in bioluminescence studies.

Sources of luciferin
Firefly, snail, bacteria, coelenterazine, dinoflagellates and deep sea fish (vargulin).

luciferin

a compound which, when acted upon by the enzyme LUCIF ERASE, gives rise to BIOLUMINESCENCE in, for example, fire-flies, glow-worms, some coelenterates and some deep-sea fish.

luciferin

(loosif´ərin),
n a chemical substance present in certain luminous organisms that, when acted upon by the enzyme luciferase, produces a glow called
bioluminescence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon injection of the substrate, luciferin, light is emitted as a result of a chemical reaction involving luciferase, luciferin, oxygen and ATP.
With luciferin, luciferase and oxygen you light the way.
Luciferase creates light in combination with oxygen, a molecule called luciferin and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a substance found in all living cells.
The assay uses a peptide substrate, that after cleavage by the "dead-cell" protease, releases luciferin.
The bioluminescence is associated with the reaction between luciferase (enzyme), luciferin (substrate), and ATP (Qureshi & Patel, 1976).
Luciferase converts the chemical luciferin into oxyluciferin, which emits light when it decays from an excited energy state.
Promega Corporation offers the new ONE-Glo[TM] Luciferase Assay Reagent, based on a completely novel luciferin analogue, that exhibits improved reproducibility with fewer false positives while generating an extended bright light signal.
5 [micro]l) of different sample solutions and the reaction mixture containing the CYP3A4 specific substrate (200 [micro]M luciferin 6' benzyl ether in phosphate buffer pH 7.
Once they add luciferin to these cells, investigators can follow the activity of the prolactin gene by using a sensitive light-gathering camera to record every glimmer.
In the present study we monitored CYP3A4 activity by the debenzylation of luciferin 6' benzyl ether into luciferase substrate.
Enzyme Preparation used Substrate sEH Recombinant purified enzyme CMNPC CES1 Recombinant partially purified enzyme CMNA CES2 Recombinant partially purified enzyme CMNA CES3 Recombinant partially purified enzyme CMNA FAAH Recombinant microsomes Octanoyl-MP PON2 Recombinant microsomes CMNA GSTs Pooled human liver cytosol CDNB CYP450 1A2 and 2C6 Pooled human liver microsomes EROD CYP450 2C9 Pooled human liver microsomes Luciferin H Enzyme Concentration Buffer ([mu]/M) sEH 5 Bis-Tris/HCI pH 7.
An enzyme, slightly different in every species but always called luciferase, produces light when it cleaves another molecule, often called luciferin.