lubricant


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lubricant

/lu·bri·cant/ (loo´brĭ-kant) a substance applied as a surface film to reduce friction between moving parts.

lubricant

[lo̅o̅′brikənt]
Etymology: L, lubricans, making slippery
a fluid, ointment, or other agent capable of diminishing friction and making a surface slippery.

lubricant

Sexology
Any material (e.g., gel, jelly or lotion) designed to reduced friction, which is used to aid sexual intercourse or masturbation.

lubricant

Medtalk An oily or slippery substance to reduce friction Sexology An endogenous–eg, vaginal secretions, or exogenous–eg, K-Y jelly, substance that  facilitates coitus
References in periodicals archive ?
iNTERSPARE Lubricants from Germany, a manufacturer of textile finishing and knitting lubricants shows in this editorial how the productivity of textile machinery can be significantly increased by using its lubricants and expertise in the textile finishing sector.
Mineral Oil Lubricants is projected to be the largest type in the Africa Automotive Lubricants market"
The plant has world-class, automated lubricant blending, filling and packaging technology.
The increasing demand for light passenger cars and heavy-duty vehicles with HVAC systems are identified as the main drivers for the automotive coolant and lubricant markets.
More than 70 percent of the time that lubricant was used for vaginal or anal intercourse, study participants indicated that they did so in order to make sex more pleasurable; more than 60 percent of women indicated this was the case during masturbation.
The automotive sector accounts for around 60% of lubricant oil consumption in the country with 40% for industrial sector.
This water-based rubber lubricant is said to be environmentally- and user-friendly, containing no hazardous ingredients of any kind.
Busperse 47 dimethyl amide of an unsaturated fatty acid functions as a lubricant in extrusion processes and a pigment dispersant and viscosity depressant in many resins.
Zinc phosphates have long been the most common lubricant additives for protecting steel parts, such as pistons and cylinders in car engines, against wear when they contact each other.
5 billion gallons of petroleum-based lubricants were sold in the United States alone, according to the National Petrochemical and Refiners Association, based in Washington, D.
Future prospects for local oil and lubricants industry will be bright only if government takes effective measures to enhance and support capacity utilization of the existing blending plants instead of giving permission for establishing substandard lubricant.