lower respiratory tract infection

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lower respiratory tract infection

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Infants and children exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome, acute lower respiratory infections, ear infections and asthma attacks.
Some cases of lower respiratory infections have also been described in children (6).
Indoor air pollution such as that stemming from biomass burning may increase the risk of acute lower respiratory infections in children, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, tuberculosis, low birth weight, asthma, ear infections, and even cataracts, according to the 2002 WHO report Addressing the Links between Indoor Air Pollution, Household Energy and Human Health.
Pathogens for lower respiratory infections in patients receiving antibiotics were the least frequently documented, she noted.
RSV often leads to serious lower respiratory infections like bronchiolitis in children under 2.
In the current study, researchers conducted a cost analysis for pediatric diseases such as gastroenteritis, ear infections, childhood asthma, leukemia and hospitalizations for lower respiratory infections.
Indoor smoke accounts for 4-5% of global mortality, with 56% of these deaths due to childhood acute lower respiratory infections and the remainder due to COPD and lung cancer, primarily in women (Ezzati and Kammen 2002; WHO 2002).
Children with diagnoses of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) were recruited consecutively alter informed parental consent.
Common adverse events reported in TYSABRI-treated patients include headache, fatigue, infusion reactions, urinary tract infections, joint and limb pain, lower respiratory infections, rash, gastroenteritis, abdominal discomfort, vaginitis, and diarrhea.
Millions of young children in underdeveloped countries die each year from diarrheal diseases, lower respiratory infections, malaria and dengue fever --diseases all related to environmental problems such as contaminated water, air pollution or mosquitoes, he said.
Viral lower respiratory infections during early infancy, especially those associated with wheezing, are a risk factor, but reliable methods of preventing these are not available, and again the data are inconsistent with some studies suggesting that viral infections have beneficial effects.
The four main diseases affected by environmental exposure are diarrhea, malaria, lower respiratory infections and unintentional injuries--all of which can be curbed with known public health techniques.

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