low-purine diet

low-purine diet

a diet used as adjunct therapy for gout patients who suffer from a painful accumulation of salts of uric acid in the joints. Purine-rich foods are primary sources of uric acid. They include meat, poultry, fish, and particularly organ meats such as liver, kidney, and sweetbreads. Purine-rich foods are replaced in the diet by dairy products, eggs, and some vegetable sources of proteins. Low-purine diets should be a secondary source of treatment, with weight loss and adequate fluid intake being primary. Also called purine-restricted diet.

low-pu·rine di·et

(lō-pyūr'ēn dī'ĕt)
A diet low in precursors of purines (such as tissues rich in cells with abundant nuclei, as in liver and glandular meats) to minimize formation of uric acid. Useful in treatment of patients with gout or urate-containing renal calculi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a strict low-purine diet isn't necessary, think about reducing your intake of foods such as liver and other offal, fish roe, meat extracts, poultry and pulses for five days out of seven.
Uric acid is produced by the breakdown of purines by the body[3], so a low-purine diet will reduce the chances of an attack.
It was formerly thought that low-purine diets were effective, but with such drugs as NSAIDs to relieve the initial attacks of pain and inflammation, and allopurinol and other drugs for long-term therapy when necessary, these bland diets are of little value.