low-dose aspirin

low-dose aspirin

Vascular disease A minimal dose of aspirin administered daily to a person known to be at risk for coronary artery occlusion
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The report you are about to read documents how daily use of low-dose aspirin could have saved 112,000 Americans from agonizing cancer death each year.
Taking low-dose aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) continuously for five years or more has been linked to a lower risk of bowel cancer.
Preventive Services Task Force "recommends low-dose aspirin use for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer in adults ages 50 to 59 years" who meet certain requirements and suggests aspirin use be individualized for those aged 60-69 years.
Paulson, a professor of obstetrics and gynaecology at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, said although the research concentrated on women with a history of miscarriage, he would now recommend taking a daily low-dose aspirin to all women trying for a baby.
New polypill developed by CNIC-Ferrer, uniquely combines atorvastatin, ramipril and low-dose aspirin to provide all-round CV protection against cardiovascular disease for people who have had a previous event.
A study published in Circulation affirmed that regular intake of low-dose aspirin may help reduce the incidence of recurrent venous blood clots referred to as venous thromboembolism, as well as the risk of cardiovascular events.
Cuzick's team, writing in the cancer journal Annals of Oncology, said that by taking low-dose aspirin every day for 10 years, bowel cancer cases could be cut by about 35 per cent and deaths by 40 per cent.
Using low-dose aspirin seems to cut the risk of pancreatic cancer by half," said Harvey Risch, professor of epidemiology at Yale University in Connecticut.
Washington, June 27 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that continuous use of low-dose aspirin may lower the risk for developing pancreatic cancer.
Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited ( Takeda ) announced today that Takelda combination tablets, a fixed-dose combination ( FDC ) of low-dose aspirin and Takepron (generic name: lansoprazole) for peptic ulcers, is now available in Japan.
The recommendation applies to asymptomatic pregnant women at increased risk for preeclampsia who have no contraindications to using low-dose aspirin and have not experienced adverse effects associated with aspirin previously.

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