love

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Drug slang A regionally popular street term for crack cocaine
Psychology The personal experience and manifest expression of emotional attachment or bonding to another person
Types Sacred and profane love, and affectional and erotic love. The word is also used in the vernacular as a synonym for like or fancy
Sports medicine Nil, naught (tennis)

love

[ME.]
1. Profound concern and affection for another person.
2. In psychoanalysis, love may be equated with pleasure, particularly as it applies to the gratifying sexual experiences between individuals.
References in classic literature ?
The unhappy lover stooped down with a sigh, and dipping his finger in the water let fall a drop on the sand.
The first theory, of assassination, was quickly abandoned when it was subjected to the light of reason, for it was evident that an assassin could have dispatched the little Prince at the same time that he killed the Lady Maud and her lover, had such been his desire.
On the evening at which we have arrived he was going to enter according to custom; but the two lovers, as we have seen, only exchanged a few words before Cornelius sent Rosa back to watch over the tulip.
Shall we then be guilty of any impropriety in calling them lovers of opinion rather than lovers of wisdom, and will they be very angry with us for thus describing them?
He promised he would not; insisting only on her forgiveness of what love, without the leave of his will, had forced from him: this, she told him, he knew how to obtain by his future behaviour; and thus this young pair tottered and trembled along, the lover not once daring to squeeze the hand of his mistress, though it was locked in his.
When the news reached Leghorn that Felix was deprived of his wealth and rank, the merchant commanded his daughter to think no more of her lover, but to prepare to return to her native country.
Each veil must seem the only one between you and your hungry lover who will have nothing less than all of you.
I am reminded of a passage in the life of a sweet lady, a friend of mine, whose daughter was on the eve of marriage, when suddenly her lover died.
Her lover has been faithful to her ever since; he has never married, and every June, on her birthday, he makes a pilgrimage to the old garden and sits for a long time in silence on the bench where he used to woo her on crimson eves and moonlight nights of long ago.
The feeling of furious anger with his wife, who would not observe the proprieties and keep to the one stipulation he had laid on her, not to receive her lover in her own home, gave him no peace.
Little Dorrit had not attained her twenty-second birthday without finding a lover.
I always take the side of the rejected lover in the stories.