louse


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Related to louse: body louse, crab louse, lice, Lowes

louse

 [lows] (pl. lice)
any of various grayish, wingless insects parasitic on birds and mammals, including humans; they are usually one sixteenth to one sixth of an inch (0.15 to 0.4 cm) long. Lice are classified into two orders, Anoplura (the sucking lice) and Mallophaga (the bird lice or biting lice). The causal organisms of typhus, relapsing fever, trench fever, and other diseases are transmitted by the bites of lice. The most important species parasitic on humans are Pediculus humanus capitis, the head louse, which attaches itself to the hairs of the head; P. humanus corporis, the body or clothes louse; and Phthirus pubis, the crab louse, which lives in the pubic hair, eyelashes, and eyebrows. Endemics of head lice infestations occur most frequently in school children. Pubic lice are often sexually transmitted. Louse infestation is called pediculosis.

louse

, pl.

lice

(lows, līs),
Common name for members of the ectoparasitic insect orders Anoplura (sucking lice) and Mallophaga (biting lice). Important species are Felicola subrostrata (cat louse), Goniocotes gallinae (fluff louse), Goniodes dissimilis (brown chicken louse), Haemodipsus ventricosus (rabbit louse), Lipeurus caponis (wing louse), Menacanthus stramineus (chicken body louse), Pthirus pubis (crab or pubic louse), and Polyplax serratus (mouse louse).
[A.S. lūs]

louse

(lous) pl. lice   any of various parasitic insects; species parasitic on humans are Pediculus humanus capitis (head l.), P. humanus corporis (body, or clothes, l.), and Phthirus pubis (crab, or pubic, l.). Lice are major vectors of typhus, relapsing fever, and trench fever.

louse

(lous)
n.
pl. lice (līs) Any of numerous small, flat-bodied, wingless biting or sucking insects of the order Phthiraptera, which live as external parasites on birds and mammals, including humans. The lice are sometimes classified together with the psocids in the order Psocodea.

louse

See lice.
A flat wingless parasitic insect, that may be a carrier of pathogens; its plural is lice

louse

 A flat wingless parasitic insect
Of Lice & Men
Biting lice, Order Mallophaga, which rarely affect humans
Sucking lice, Order Anoplua, family Pediculidae, which are global in distribution, and serve as either
• Disease vectors, eg Borrelia recurrentisBhermisi turcatae, B parkeri or
• Themselves cause disease—Pediculus humanis capitis, head lice, Pediculus humanis corporis, body lice, Phthirus pubis, crabs, pubic lice  

louse

, pl. lice (lows, līs)
Common name for members of the ectoparasitic insect orders Anoplura (sucking lice) and Mallophaga (biting lice).
[A.S. lūs]
Enlarge picture
LOUSE: SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; James Gathany

louse

(lows) Pediculus.

body louse

Pediculus humanus corporis.

clothes louse

See: Pediculus humanus corporis

crab louse

Phthirus inguinalis and Phthirus pubis; the louse that infests the pubic region and other hairy areas of the body. See: pediculosis

head louse

Pediculus humanus capitis. See: illustration

louse

See LICE.

louse

any wingless insect of the order Mallophaga (bird lice or biting lice) or the order Anopleura (sucking lice).

louse

pl. lice; a general name for various species-specific parasitic insects, the true lice, which infest mammals and belong to the order Phthiraptera. This is divided into two suborders, Mallophaga, the biting lice, and Anoplura, the sucking lice. They are grayish, wingless, dorsoventrally flattened, and vary in length from about 1.5 to 4 mm. They stimulate rubbing, scratching and restlessness, causing damage to fleece and loss of production. Heavy infestations with sucking lice may cause serious anemia. Louse infestation is also called pediculosis.
The term louse is also used loosely with respect to other external parasites, e.g. whale 'lice' are barnacles and small copepods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the potential for louse transmission through shared outdoor bedding (i.
The tiny, blood-sucking body louse Pediculus humanus humanus L.
Elston said, "eyelash nits are usually a manifestation of pubic louse infestation, not head louse infestation.
Before genetic tools that differentiate the head and body louse lineages were available (5), it was speculated that body lice may have originated from head lice (9).
quintana DNA was found in 1 (3%) head louse and in 7 (11%) body lice.
Parents should not diagnose head louse infestations themselves.
The cleaner the hair, the easier it is for a louse to claw onto a strand of hair and make it up to the scalp to feed.
Each louse was rinsed twice in sterile water for 15 minutes, and then total genomic DNA was extracted from each louse by using a QIAamp Tissue kit (QIAGEN, Hilden, Germany) as described by the manufacturer.
The snug match between louse and feather may help explain why lice remain so specific to hosts, says Al-Tamimi.
The human body louse and human head louse are generally recognized as 2 subspecies of Pediculus humanus (P.
Now available to consumers at national, regional and local drug stores, Robi-Comb is an electronic comb which detects a louse in a person's hair and "zaps" it, killing the louse and dislodging it from the hair shaft.
Ladibugs is also the only Minnesota head lice removal service certified to use the "LouseBuster," which is the first FDA-cleared medical device to treat head lice and louse eggs (nits).