loudness


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Related to loudness: loudness unit, Loudness war

loudness

The perceived intensity of sound. It often reflects the amplitude and frequency of a sonic stimulus, but because it varies from person to person, it is a subjective, rather than a purely measurable entity.
See: decibel
References in periodicals archive ?
Like many broadcasters around the world, Al Jazeera respects loudness legislation and follows the global standards imposed by regulators.
Psychoacoustic metrics are widely used to represent human perceptions of various sounds, and actually some of the most used ones, for example the loudness and sharpness, have already been standardized for routine uses.
In this realm of loudness, anyone who attempts to express an alternate viewpoint in a calm voice is quickly lost.
Further psychoacoustic transformations are applied: Computation of the Phon scale incorporates equal loudness curves, which account for the different perception of loudness at different frequencies.
At the end of treatment, the TSI and the 10-point loudness scale values were reexamined, and audiologic tests were carried out again.
These patients were also subjected to visual analogue scale for loudness in cm along a 10 cm scale.
Bulgaria's current legislation lacks existing guidelines on this issue and leaves it to the broadcasters to use a subjective loudness meter.
Known for their blistering technical ability, Loudness was formed in Japan in 1981 by guitarist Akira Takasaki and late drummer Munetaka Higuchi.
Another solution to be displayed at booth 7/J16 is the Observer loudness monitoring system.
Announcing the launch at the NAB Show 2011, a major digital media industry event which runs till April 14 in Las Vegas, Dolby said the new model enabling operators to easily monitor the loudness level of audio.
Isaac Rice as a pioneer of public loudness suits another side of Prochnik's quest, his effort to understand the aficionados of noise.
Aeq]) consistently correlates most strongly with subjective responses of loudness, annoyance and dissatisfaction.