unconsciousness

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unconsciousness

 [un-kon´shus-nes]
an abnormal state of lack of response to sensory stimuli, resulting from injury, illness, shock, or some other bodily disorder. A brief loss of consciousness from which the person recovers spontaneously or with slight help is called syncope or faint. Deep, prolonged unconsciousness is known as coma. See also levels of consciousness.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-ness),
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

unconsciousness

[unkon′shəsnəs]
a state of complete or partial unawareness or lack of response to sensory stimuli as a result of hypoxia caused by respiratory insufficiency or shock; from metabolic or chemical brain depressants such as drugs, poisons, ketones, or electrolyte imbalance; or from a form of brain pathological condition such as trauma, seizures, cerebrovascular accident, brain tumor, or infection. Various degrees of unconsciousness can occur during stupor, fugue, catalepsy, and dream states. See also coma.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of the self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

unconsciousness

A state of unrousability caused by brain damage and associated with reduced activity in part of the BRAINSTEM called the reticular formation. Unconsciousness varies in depth from a light state, in which the unconscious person responds to stimuli by moving or protesting, to a state of profound coma in which even the strongest stimuli evoke no response. Causes include head injury, inadequate blood supply to the brain, fainting, asphyxia, poisoning, near drowning, starvation, low blood sugar (HYPOGLYCAEMIA) and severe KETOSIS.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma.

unconsciousness

an abnormal state of lack of response to sensory stimuli, resulting from injury, illness, shock or some other bodily disorder. A brief loss of unconsciousness from which the animal recovers spontaneously or with slight aid is called fainting. Deep, prolonged unconsciousness is known as coma. See also levels of consciousness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though sometimes it is difficult to differentiate epilepsy from syncope, the symptoms surrounding the loss of consciousness may be useful in clinical practice (1,5,6).
In other words, immediate loss of blood supply to the brain leads to almost instantaneous loss of consciousness.
The condition does not always produce symptoms but the classic warning sign is a sudden severe headache thatmay cause loss of consciousness.
government health statistics say concentrations of H2S greater than 500 parts per million can cause loss of consciousness and can be lethal.
A day before admission she had generalized tonic clonic convulsions that progressed to status epilepticus, followed by loss of consciousness.
He moves all extremities, has no neck pain, no loss of consciousness, but doesn't remember getting hit, the quarter, or who the opponent is.
19%) to report the recent onset of at least 1 of 15 serious symptoms, such as shortness of breath, chest pain, persistent headache, or loss of consciousness.
Since their surgery, 21 of the study participants have had no seizure that caused loss of consciousness.
Effects of cyanide exposure can range from loss of consciousness to death.
These independent variables included: presence of lower-extremity hypertonicity, presence of lower-extremity injury (fracture, subluxation or dislocation), loss of consciousness for more than 24 hours after injury, presence of brain pathology in addition to diffuse injury (e.
Sentinel also includes a post-concussion questionnaire that summarizes the patient's symptoms at the time of testing, and also other useful information (time since injury, whether loss of consciousness occurred etc.