longitudinal research


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longitudinal research

A long-term study of a cohort (a group of subjects born during a particular time period) that determines the natural history of an illness or the enduring effects of a treatment.
See also: research
References in periodicals archive ?
Longitudinal research seems to be the appropriate methodology to overcome the limitations of a cross-sectional study design so researchers can examine a developmental trajectory on career maturity.
Im (1990) pointed to different types of longitudinal research models as growth curve approach, stability approach, and the school effect approach.
Future longitudinal research should use multiple measures of both emotion-based empathy and perspective-taking in order to understand which aspects of empathy may be more stable and which may be more context-sensitive.
She added: "Future research should examine these associations using a longitudinal research design.
Strelan, Acton, and Patrick encouraged others to conduct longitudinal research that could prove causation between these variables.
A new longitudinal research study will measure the effectiveness of nonprofit charter school management organizations (CMOs).
One particularly productive stream of longitudinal research can be traced to pioneering studies examining the natural history and causes of antisocial behavior and mental health disorders (Glueck & Glueck, 1950; Robins, 1966; Rutter, 1981; Vaillant, 1983; West & Farrington, 1973).
There is nothing in my longitudinal research or any of my writings to support such conclusions (about same-gender families).
However, it is important to clarify that the preliminary results of this longitudinal research project are not conclusive, and are subject to further scrutiny.
Longitudinal research demonstrates several features that permit the observation of process and change and facilitate identification and evaluation of the underlying factors.
At the same time, longitudinal research suggests that nearly half the students who begin at community college do not obtain a degree or enroll in another college or university within six years.
Lynch's view was reinforced by Geoffrey Nelson and colleagues' 2003 meta-analysis of longitudinal research on 34 preschool programs for disadvantaged children, which found small to moderate positive effects on children's cognitive and social-emotional functioning and parent-family wellness.
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