long-acting insulin


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long-acting insulin

a preparation of insulin modified by an interaction with zinc under specific chemical conditions and supplied as a suspension with a prolonged action. An injection of the preparation takes effect within 8 hours, reaches a peak of action in 16 to 24 hours, and has a duration of action of more than 36 hours. Also called slow-acting insulin, ultralente insulin. Compare intermediate-acting insulin, short-acting insulin. See also insulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the long-acting insulin analog glargine after 1 week of use compared with its first administration in subjects with type 1 diabetes.
All participants were switched to ultra-long-acting IDeg with an average dose of 68 [+ or -] 13% of their usual pre-study long-acting insulin dose, for daily conditions.
Timing of insulin administration can be especially troublesome because long-acting insulin may be active up to 24 hours.
The modified insulin was able to give more appropriate control of blood sugar than the unmodified insulin or the long-acting insulin," Anderson says.
Time-action profile of the long-acting insulin analog insulin glargine (HOE901) in comparison with those of NPH insulin and placebo.
As there is no background long-acting insulin, stopping the pump (or pump malfunction) can lead to hyperglycaemia and possibly ketosis within hours4.
The new research was released after mounting speculation that damaging data was about to be published over a cancer link with Sanofis modern long-acting insulin analogue, sinking the French drugmakers share price by 12.
Apidra is intended for use with intermediate- or long-acting insulin.
As a result, diabetics who also require long-acting insulin will still need to inject that type of insulin.
Diabetics who cannot produce any insulin require one or two long-acting insulin injections a day and then either pills or injections of fast-acting, short-term insulin at mealtime.
Because this is a short-acting powder form of insulin, it won't do away with injections and people will still have to inject themselves with a long-acting insulin," said Mark Rubino, chief pharmacy officer for Aetna Inc.