logorrhea


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Related to logorrhea: spoliator

logorrhea

 [log″o-re´ah]
excessive volubility, with rapid, pressured speech, as in manic episodes of bipolar disorder and some cases of schizophrenia. Called also lalorrhea, pressured speech, tachylalia, and tachyphasia.

log·or·rhe·a

(log'ō-rē'ă),
Rarely used term for abnormal or pathologic talkativeness or garrulousness.
[logo- + G. rhoia, a flow]

logorrhea

/log·or·rhea/ (-re´ah) pressured speech; excessive and rapid speech, seen in certain mental disorders.

log·or·rhe·a

(lawg'ōr-ē'ă)
Abnormal or pathologic talkativeness or garrulousness.
Synonym(s): logorrhoea.
[logo- + G. rhoia, a flow]
References in periodicals archive ?
19) In her manuscript as well, Guillemard consistently attempted to "professionalize" her language and cut her stories short--"an undammable logorrhea of Kingsleyese," he later called her discursive tales; (20) she resisted--and won--terming his unacceptable Latinate flourishes Guillamardese.
I knew exactly how to spell logorrhea, and what it means.
They owe far more, in any case, to literature and logorrhea than to observation or experience of external reality.
But just as Spenser's use of giants as rebels against reason and spirit contrasts strikingly with the comic and therapeutic roles accorded to Rabelais's own heroes, so Lake Prescott argues that the related themes of scatology, logorrhea, satire, and fantasy popularized by Rabelais's own work elicited a peculiar combination of fascination and revulsion among many of the writers who borrowed from or imitated him.
This is not to say that he merely lashes-or, in the case of Vienna, bashes-his victims with immense gusto; he also often includes himself in the ironic fun, as he does in this novel too when he has his narrator, a retired Greek teacher and maniacal monologist from Carinthia, presenting himself as a man of few words while at the same time accusing his brother Franz of incurable logorrhea.
The worst cases of legal logorrhea ("excessive and often incoherent talkativeness or wordiness") are enhanced with all sorts of additional folderols and semantic filler.
Next to Clinton's incompetence and Newt's logorrhea, Dole's age (he'll be 73 if elected) and experience actually work for him, especially within the G.
Consider the logorrhea of the Speaker in The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover, and the obsessive bodily functions to which the profusion of language can barely gain access.
The Chretien de Troyes apothegm that introduces Pauline at the Beach wittily suggests the logorrhea of Rohmer's characters--their wagging tongues never tire--and their infinite capacity for linguistic snares.
Not I, if you remember, is about a mouth with a bad case of logorrhea, a minimalist image that appears profound when seen on stage, lascivious on a poster for The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but just sad when the mouth belongs to your date.
65) According to Wayne, Yale's "acute logorrhea, which is apparently not susceptible to any effective treatment, is well known to all.
Wit, joy, surprise, and Dadaist insolence yielded thereafter unresistingly to lazy logorrhea, easy egomania.