locus of control


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Related to locus of control: Internal locus of control, External locus of control

locus

 [lo´kus] (L.)
1. a place or site.
2. in genetics, the specific site of a gene on a chromosome.
locus ceru´leus a pigmented eminence in the superior angle of the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain.
locus of control a belief regarding responsibility for actions. Individuals with an internal locus of control generally hold themselves responsible for actions and consequences, while those with an external locus of control tend to believe that they are not able to affect a personal outcome and that luck or destiny are responsible for their actions.

lo·cus of con·trol

a theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over his/her own behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.

locus of control

Etymology: L, locus, place; Fr, controle
a center of perceived responsibility for one's behavior. Individuals with an internal locus of control believe that they can control events related to their life, whereas those with an external locus of control tend to believe that real power resides in forces outside themselves and determines their life.

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
1. A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
2. biowarfare A place from which a terrorist event is evaluated and managed.

locus of control

a person's generalized belief or expectation about whether behavioural outcomes (specifically, rewards and punishments) are within their control (the consequence of their own actions) or due to external factors (the consequence of chance, fate or the influence of powerful others). Individuals' generalized locus of control beliefs apply to most of their behaviours, especially in novel situations. Individuals also develop domain-specific control beliefs based upon personal experience, for example health locus of control beliefs: whether health outcomes are due to their own behaviour or to external, uncontrollable factors.

locus of control,

n the orientation that a person holds as to where control over life events is relative to the self—internal or external meaning, self-control, or other-controlled.

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.

locus of control,

n a psychologic concept that defines people as having either an internal or external locus of control, depending on whether they are more self-reliant and independent or more communally focused and dependent on others.
References in periodicals archive ?
H2c: Parents' responsible financial behavior reduces external locus of control.
In support of Hypothesis 5, the interaction between internal locus of control and academic support services increased the amount of variance explained in CDSE to 19%, [DELTA][R.
2]: Doctors having internal locus of control exhibit lower levels of role stress.
According to Bruk-Lee, Khoury, Nixon, Goh and Spector (2009), locus of control is one of the most studied personality traits and its effect on work outcomes has been reported widely (e.
Locus of Control (LOCP): Locus of control is a learned behaviour where in which the individuals attribute responsibility for events or to factors within themselves and within their control or to factors outside their control Rotter (1954; 1960 and 1972).
Simons, et al (1987) maintain that tolerance for ambiguity is associated with the internal locus of control, itself another characteristic attributed to the entrepreneurs.
Locus of control refers to the perceived control over the events of one's life.
Services providers should also be cognizant of the relationship between locus of control beliefs and different health attitudes, behaviors, and situations (Coan, 1973; Crisp & Barber, 2001; Steptoe & Wardle, 2001; Wooldridge, Wallston, Graber, Brown, & Davidson, 1992).
The combination of the key factors of conscientiousness, locus of control and impulsivity can help determine an accurate and consistent method of screening individuals for jobs that have a higher possibility of accidents or physical injury.
9) People with an internal locus of control believe they have power over their own destiny.
Specifically, internal locus of control, personal expertise, and attitudinal response are modeled as determinants of intentions to purchase sport products for both revered (Study 1) and hated (Study 2) teams.