locked knee


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locked knee

a condition in which the knee lacks full extension and flexion because of internal derangement, usually the result of a torn meniscus.

locked knee

Etymology: AS, loc + cneow
a condition in which the knee is fixed in either a flexed or an extended position, often caused by longitudinal splitting of the medial meniscus. Also called trick knee.
A knee limited in its range of movement by a loose joint body or ‘mouse’, a meniscus—usually medial—tear, or patellofemoral derangement

locked knee

Trick knee A knee limited in its range of movement by a loose joint body or 'mouse', a meniscus–usually medial–tear, or patellofemoral derangement

lock·ed knee

(lokt nē)
A condition in which the knee lacks full extension and flexion because of internal derangement, usually the result of a torn medial meniscus.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) 0 (0) Walking, n (%) Aids Used (n) 2 Crutches 1 -- 2 Tetrapods -- -- No Aids 7 22 HS = healthy subject, SD = standard deviation, TFA-LK = subject with transfemoral amputation with prosthesis with locked knee, TFA-UK = subject with transfemoral amputation with prosthesis with unlocked knee, TTA = subject with transtibial amputation.
In general, these studies indicated that kinematic parameters, especially knee flexion during swing phase and pelvic motion, improved when subjects walked with a stance-control device compared with a completely locked knee joint.
Although I don't think locked knees are best for anyone, because locked knees interrupt any hope of body flow, which is often essential when a buck or bull is drifting slowly by (not on the run, or the bowhunter wouldn't shoot at all) but simply ambling along.
He proclaims that in ballet "everything is done with stiff necks, locked knees and limp wrists," neglecting to tell us that Lincoln Kirstein once nearly recruited him for New York City Ballet.
I'D HAVE felt sorry for the young mum battling with her screaming two-year-old outside Woolworths the other day (I've been there, know the embarrassment when little darling goes rigid and refuses to sit in his pushchair, but those were the olden days when a quick slap was allowed, though a poke behind the locked knees to make them bend works just as well).
When we let go of hunched shoulders, locked knees, or hyper-extended backs, we begin to get back to our primal state of grace.