lochia

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lochia

 [lo´ke-ah]
a vaginal discharge occurring after childbirth. Lochia discharge should be checked every 15 minutes for the first hour after delivery, once every hour for the first 8 hours, and then every 8 hours. adj., adj lo´chial.
lochia al´ba the final vaginal discharge after childbirth, largely mucus, when the amount of blood is decreased and the leukocytes are increased; it is usually of 10 to 14 days' duration but may last for 6 weeks.
lochia cruen´ta lochia rubra.
lochia purulen´ta lochia alba.
lochia ru´bra that occurring immediately after childbirth, consisting of blood, fragments of decidua, and mucus. It usually lasts from 1 to 3 days.
lochia sanguinolen´ta (lochia sero´sa) the vaginal discharge occurring 3 to 10 days after delivery. It is pink or brown-tinged and contains blood, mucus, and leukocytes.

lo·chi·a

(lō'kē-ă),
Discharges from the vagina of mucus, blood, and tissue debris, following childbirth.
[G. neut. pl. of lochios, relating to childbirth, fr. lochos, childbirth]

lochia

/lo·chia/ (lo´ke-ah) a vaginal discharge occurring during the first week or two after childbirth.lo´chial
lochia al´ba  the final vaginal discharge after childbirth, when the amount of blood is decreased and the leukocytes are increased.
lochia cruen´ta  l. rubra.
lochia ru´bra  that occurring immediately after childbirth, consisting almost entirely of blood.
lochia sanguinolen´ta  l. serosa.
lochia sero´sa  the serous vaginal discharge occurring four or five days after childbirth.

lochia

(lō′kē-ə, lŏk′ē-ə)
pl.n. Medicine
The normal uterine discharge of blood, tissue, and mucus from the vagina after childbirth.

lo′chi·al adj.

lochia

[lō′kē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, lochos, childbirth
the discharge that flows from the vagina after childbirth. During the first 2 to 4 days after delivery, the lochia is red or brownish red (called lochia rubra) and is made up of blood, endometrial decidua, fetal lanugo, vernix, and sometimes meconium, and it has a fleshy odor. About the third day the amount of blood diminishes. The placental site exudes serous material, erythrocytes, lymph, cervical mucus, and microorganisms from the superficial layer called lochia serosa. During the next 10 to 14 days bacteria appear in large numbers along with mucinous decidual material and epithelial cells, causing the lochia to appear whitish yellow (lochia alba). This may continue for 3 to 6 weeks into the postpartum period. lochial, adj.

lo·chi·a

(lō'kē-ă)
Discharge from the vagina of mucus, blood, and tissue debris, following childbirth.
[G. neut. pl. of lochios, relating to childbirth, fr. lochos, childbirth]

lochia

The discharge of blood, mucus and particles of tissue from the womb, mainly coming from site of the afterbirth (PLACENTA), during the first 2 or 3 weeks after birth. The discharge is red for the first 3 or 4 days and usually disappears by about the tenth day. Offensive-smelling lochia suggests infection and is a danger sign.

lochia

a vaginal discharge occurring during the first week or two after parturition.

lochia alba
the final vaginal discharge after parturition, when the amount of blood is decreased and the leukocytes are increased.
lochia cruenta
lochia rubra.
lochia purulenta
lochia alba.
lochia rubra
that occurring immediately after parturition, consisting almost entirely of blood.
lochia sanguinolenta
the serous uterine discharge occurring four or five days after parturition. Called also lochia serosa.
lochia serosa
see lochia sanguinolenta (above).