lobbying

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lobbying

Attempting to shape legislation, influence legislators, or mold public opinion.

lobbying,

n the act of influencing, by argumentation, the course of action of a legislator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The near-death experience may only have made them more powerful: "When everyone is trying to kill you and you survive and you fight back tough, you gain tremendously," says the Democratic lobbyist.
One of his lobbyists, Patrick Pizzella, sent an e-mail the next day reporting how Sheldon reacted.
Effective management of a contract lobbyist begins during the hiring process with an assessment of your expectations.
If the lobbyist needs to scramble to get up to speed, the shortened time period of the contract is not apt to inspire a discount of their fee.
You can't just keep your head down and escape the government," says Jim Albertine, president of the American League of Lobbyists and a partner in Albertine Enterprises.
But conversations between lobbyists and the governor's office shouldn't start once bills pass the House and Senate, the lobbyists say.
BOSTON -- There are a few things Beacon Hill lawmakers can depend on: endless public hearings, late-night budget debates and a steady stream of campaign dollars from registered lobbyists hoping to catch their ear.
As Kurt Leib, lobbyist for Ohio's Capitol Advocates, told new lawmakers at their orientation session, "Don't introduce legislation Monday morning based on watching '60 Minutes' the night before.
Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law School professor, wrote a book in 2011 titled Republic, Lost: How Money Corrupts Congress-and a Plan to Stop It, yet he was compelled to admit that "the lobbyist today is ethical, and well educated.
Campbell said he cultivated the habit of asking the lobbyist to explain the opposing side's view after a lobbyist had made a pitch.
Lobbyists are a pervasive force in Washington responsible for the daily workings of government and politics.
Economic-impact studies, professional television campaigns, and contracts with lobbyists all have their places in state and local relations.