litmus test


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litmus test

n.
A test for chemical acidity or basicity using litmus paper.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a litmus test may or may not be wrong, but there is nothing new about politicians opposing judicial nominees because of their positions on issues.
They had regarded the issue as a litmus test of Labour's policy on roadbuilding in Britain.
The litmus test is going to be whether they catch and prosecute the major kingpins in Mexico.
While denying that he has a litmus test on judges, pro-abortion Vice President and potential Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore made his intentions clear regarding Supreme Court appointments: they will support abortion.
Thus, the litmus test for new policy proposals to deal with racial inequality in economic life should be whether or not they result in significant amelioration in the businesses and human and non-human capital.
I don't think we'll ever find a litmus test for identifying victims of sexual abuse," contends coinvestigator John Briere of the University of Southern California School of Medicine in Los An les.
The litmus test Mansfield applies through most of the nineteenth-century interpretations is that of the comparison of Erasmus to Luther--usually to the disadvantage of Erasmus.
His art is a litmus test for the time, a reflection of his insatiable appetite for contemporary art.
This user conference was an important litmus test of the growth and direction of our company," said Ben Horowitz, president and CEO, Opsware.
Some groups have promised to make the issue a litmus test during this year's elections, and pressure on lawmakers is expected to be intense.
Bush has stated he would not use abortion as a litmus test for choosing Supreme Court nominees.