litigate

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litigate

[lit′əgāt]
(in law) to carry on a suit or to contest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Litigating Minor Impact Soft Tissue Cases, the best-selling autocrash-litigation guide by Karen Koehler and Michael D.
The Tax Court has adopted the position that IRS revenue rulings are mere litigating positions.
Without a means of shifting the economic costs of litigating fee-amount disputes to opponents, parties are limited to traditional means of dispute resolution, which increasingly means burdensome and wasteful mini-trials.
Although the ABA calls loser-pays a "tax on the right to litigate," it could just as easily be called a subsidy for litigating in a rightful cause.
Applied to litigating high-damage cases, elements of a business plan control case development such that chances of the desired case outcome are maximized.
The move is expected to shorten the process of investigating and litigating SEC rule 2(e) actions against accountants alleged to have engaged in improper professional conduct or to have violated the securities laws.
Now, at 49, she heads a staff of 80 employees and oversees 28 lawyers litigating a docket of more than 300 cases.
Rubin, former Deputy Chief Counsel of Enforcement for FINRA's predecessor, stated: "Many firms and registered representatives fear litigating against FINRA because its staff has often spent months or even years investigating the conduct.
Bass, known for litigating complex cases to victory, will discuss his winning strategies that recently resulted in a father being reunited with his children after it was reported he had been kicked to the curb.
Litigating Catastrophically Injured Infant Cases * February 25-26, 2005 Ritz-Carlton, Buckhead Atlanta, GA
In addition, on March 15, 2002, the IRS issued Chief Counsel Notice 2002-021, which announced a change in the IRS'S litigating position on capitalization of transaction costs for the acquisition, creation or enhancement of intangible assets.
Perhaps it was because we quoted the Tax Court as disparaging revenue rulings as merely representing the Internal Revenue Service's litigating position.