litigate

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litigate

[lit′əgāt]
(in law) to carry on a suit or to contest.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Report of the Special Task Force on Formal Opinion 85-352 says the realistic possibility standard is met if there is a one-in-three chance of success should the tax position under consideration be litigated.
Most of these changes have fallen within two frontiers: coverage questions concerning claims arising from the Internet and procedural questions concerning where Internet-related disputes will be litigated.
If the Service persists in denying Section 530 relief to state and local employers, it seems inevitable that this issue will be litigated.
He has litigated cases involving trademarks used in connection with digital copyright management software, celebrity-branded products, luxury goods, publishing, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, as well as copyright matters.
However, the Court noted the taxpayer's success was largely a function of the manner in which the government litigated the case: Its strategy was designed to show that, as a legal matter, CBIs and goodwill are inextricably intertwined; it did not attempt to impugn the taxpayer's expert witnesses regarding their views on CBIs' useful lives.
He has counseled clients and litigated a wide array of issues arising out of the production of television shows and motion pictures, as well as the publication of newspaper and magazine articles.
A prior year's abatement claim is currently being litigated by Olympic Tower through an Article 78 proceeding.
In explaining the size of the fee award at a hearing October 10, 2008, San Mateo Superior Court Judge Carol Mittlesteadt said that the case had been "litigated, and litigated, and litigated" since it was filed in 2005.
She has litigated numerous cases in both federal and state courts representing plaintiffs and defendants in a wide array of business disputes.
While this case was litigated in federal court, it drew upon California law.
For example, the tax manager may have received an opinion from counsel that the company's position is strong and that the company is likely to prevail if the matter is litigated.
A passive approach to managing litigated claims invites unexpected and unfavorable outcomes.