lithotomy position


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position

 [pŏ-zish´un]
1. a bodily posture or attitude.
2. the relationship of a given point on the presenting part of the fetus to a designated point of the maternal pelvis; see accompanying table. See also presentation.
Common examination positions. From Lammon et al., 1995.
anatomical position that of the human body standing erect, palms facing forward; it is the position of reference in designating site or direction of structures of the body. The anatomical position for quadrupeds is standing with all four feet on the ground; the difference between animal and human anatomical position leads to confusion among terms indicating position and direction.
The body in the anatomical poisition, showing regions of the body. From Applegate, 2000.
batrachian position a lying position of infants in which the lower limbs are flexed, abducted, and resting on the bed on their outer aspects, resembling the legs of a frog.
Bozeman's position the knee-elbow position with straps used for support.
decubitus position that of the body lying on a horizontal surface, designated according to the aspect of the body touching the surface as dorsal decubitus (on the back), left or right lateral decubitus (on the left or right side), and ventral decubitus (on the anterior surface). In radiology, the patient is placed in either the right or left lateral decubitus position with the beam perpendicular to the long axis of the body.
dorsal recumbent position position of patient on the back, with lower limbs flexed and rotated outward; used in vaginal examination, application of obstetrical forceps, and other procedures. See illustration.
Fowler's position a position in which the head of the patient's bed is raised 30 to 90 degrees above the level, with the knees sometimes also elevated. See illustration.
Low Fowler's.
froglike position batrachian position.
knee-chest position the patient rests on the knees and chest with head is turned to one side, arms extended on the bed, and elbows flexed and resting so that they partially bear the patient's weight; the abdomen remains unsupported, though a small pillow may be placed under the chest. See illustration.
knee-elbow position the patient resting on the knees and elbows with the chest elevated.
lateral position Sims' position.
lithotomy position the patient lies on the back with the legs well separated, thighs acutely flexed on the abdomen, and legs on thighs; stirrups may be used to support the feet and legs. See illustration.
orthopneic position a position assumed to relieve orthopnea (difficulty breathing except when in an upright position); the patient assumes an upright or semivertical position by using pillows to support the head and chest, or sits upright in a chair.
prone position a position with the patient lying face down with arms bent comfortably at the elbow and padded with the armboards positioned forward.
Prone position. From Lammon et al., 1995.
reverse Trendelenburg position a supine position with the patient on a plane inclined with the head higher than the rest of the body and appropriate safety devices such as a footboard.
Rose's position one intended to prevent aspiration or swallowing of blood, as from an injured lip: the patient is supine with head hanging over the end of the table in full extension so as to enable bleeding to be over the margins of the inverted upper incisors.
semi-Fowler position a position similar to Fowler's position but with the head less elevated.
Sims position the patient lies on the left side with the left thigh slightly flexed and the right thigh acutely flexed on the abdomen; the left arm is behind the body with the body inclined forward, and the right arm is positioned according to the patient's comfort. See illustration. Called also lateral position.
Sims recumbent position a variant of the Sims position in which the patient lies on the left side in a modified left lateral position; the upper leg is flexed at hip and knees, the lower leg is straight, and the upper arm rests in a flexed position on the bed.
Trendelenburg's position the patient is on the back on a table or bed whose upper section is inclined 45 degrees so that the head is lower than the rest of the body; the adjustable lower section of the table or bed is bent so that the patient's legs and knees are flexed. There is support to keep the patient from slipping. See illustration.

li·thot·o·my po·si·tion

Avoid the redundant phrase dorsal lithotomy position.
A supine position with buttocks at the end of the operating table, the hips and knees being fully flexed with feet strapped in position.

lithotomy position

n.
A supine position in which the hips and knees are fully flexed with the legs spread apart and raised and the feet resting in straps.

lithotomy position

the position assumed by the patient lying supine with the hips and the knees flexed and the thighs abducted and rotated externally. Also called dorsosacral position.
enlarge picture
Standard lithotomy position

li·thot·o·my po·si·tion

(li-thot'ǒ-mē pŏ-zish'ŏn)
A supine position with buttocks at the end of the operating table, the hips and knees being fully flexed with feet strapped in position.

lithotomy position

The position in which a patient is placed for gynaecological operations or for any surgical procedure on the PERINEUM. The patient lies on his or her back with the knees up and the thighs spread wide. The feet and thighs are usually supported in slings.
References in periodicals archive ?
T1 = 1 minute after induction, T2=10 minutes after lithotomy position, T3 = 10 minutes after pneumoperitoneum, T4=30 minutes after pneumoperitoneum, T5 = 10 minutes before the end of procedure, EtC[O.
Most PCNL series to treat forgotten encrusted stents describe the approach in the prone position, which means the patient has to be changed from lithotomy position if cystolithopaxy and/or URS are required prior to the percutaneous approach.
Even though pulmonary oxygen exchange is well maintained in healthy young women (11), patients undergoing laparoscopy in the Trendelenburg lithotomy position are predisposed to decrease in arterial oxygenation because of basal atelectasis, reduced functional residual capacity induced by general anaesthesia, mechanical ventilation and surgical positioning.
The issue of provider control of the labour process and environment was frequently reported by providers as the main reason for such inappropriate practices as limiting mobility during labour, restricting women to the lithotomy position to give birth, and the routine use of oxytocin to speed up labour and to free up beds for the next women coming in.
Some of the infrequent causes of compartment syndrome that have been identified include fluid shifts from dialysis or fluid replacement in burn patients, and even exercise (3,8-10) Previous reports have documented the occurrence of leg compartment syndromes from placing the patient in the lithotomy position for operations that lasted longer than 6 hours.
I often see it ignored still, especially during vaginal delivery in the lithotomy position and sometimes after epidural analgesia in labour.
However, none allow a companion during labour and birth, and the lithotomy position for giving birth is still used with a liberal use of episiotomy, particularly for first pregnancies.
The patient was placed in the lithotomy position under general anesthesia.
The preoperative PRST was performed by retrograde fill (300 mL), removing the catheter and performing Valsalva and cough testing in lithotomy position without prolapse reduction, in lithotomy with prolapse reduced with Procto Swabs, and standing with prolapse reduced.
After obtaining approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent, we studied 100 patients of either gender (aged 25 to 60 years, ASA I or II) undergoing elective minor radiotherapy, gynaecological and general surgical procedures of short to moderate duration in supine or lithotomy position.