literate

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literate

(lit′ĕ-răt) [L. litteratus, marked with letters]
Being able to read and write, and to use written language as in understanding graphs, charts, tables, maps, symbols, and formulas. literacy (-ră-sē)

number literacy

The ability of patients to understand their lab values and make lifestyle adjustments accordingly.
References in periodicals archive ?
For this a totally literate society aware of one's own duties and responsibilities should be established.
At this juncture it's very clear that we can't ensure a healthy population and hygiene atmosphere unless the population is literate.
No one can instigate violence or breaking of law and order in a literate and enlightened society.
These results suggest that experts and literates are unlikely to have a common basis for discussing reporting issues, and highlight the need either to educate literates on the SFAC No.
Our findings also indicate that experts and literates bring differing viewpoints to the identification and evaluation of specific financial reporting concerns.
There are also ongoing debates regarding the relationship between the types of home literate practices in which children are engaged and their success in classroom literacy events (Auerbach 1989, Cairney & Ruge 1997, Heath 1982, Morrow 1995).
Purcell-Gates 1996, Barnhart & Sulzby 1986, Teale 1986, Taylor & Dorsey-Gaines 1988) have all identified the existence of extensive literate practices and recognition in these families that literacy is important.
Two, when judging the criticality of reporting issues, financial literates attend to issues that are prominent (in terms of business press coverage) and nonrecurring more than do financial experts.
program meet NYSE (and other) requirements for designation as financial experts and financial literates, respectively, they voiced concern about how well these two "convenience" samples represent real-world audit committees.
4 million people literate through its 164,190 adult literacy centers and non formal schools which include 90% women, she added.
We should now ask: Is the view tenable, as one critic claims, that the literate Frederick Douglass is "'as cast away,' without real community, by virtue of the medium of a distancing discourse" (Ziolkowski 156-57)?
Acquiring literacy, Baker claims, will thrust the slave directly into the dominant literate culture, with fresh identity and transformed, in Douglass's case, "into a sharer in the general public discourse about slavery" (43).