literate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to literate: Literate programming

literate

(lit′ĕ-răt) [L. litteratus, marked with letters]
Being able to read and write, and to use written language as in understanding graphs, charts, tables, maps, symbols, and formulas. literacy (-ră-sē)

number literacy

The ability of patients to understand their lab values and make lifestyle adjustments accordingly.
References in periodicals archive ?
Israel (68%), Canada (68%), the United Kingdom (67%), the Netherlands (66%) and Germany (66%) are also among the most financially literate countries in the world.
The contradiction between what it means to be literate in today's world and the pressures of high stakes testing is causing frustration for many teachers as they try to force children who have been born into a multimodal world to adopt and learn old understandings of what it means to be literate.
In most cases, internal armed conflicts around the globe emerge among less literate regions or less educated population groups.
Blueprint for a Literate Nation has multiple contributing writers, industry experts from across the country:
So does this mean that if they are not computer literate they are going to be denied benefits?
A child's sense of being literate can affect what that child learns and how he or she learns it.
We are of the view that the drivers must be literate," Bihar transport minister Brishen Patel told the media on Monday.
To our surprise, the most populous and culturally-reputed cities in America did not rank among the most digitally literate.
2007; Pearson, 1976); however it is an assumption of this paper that competent literary writers (even emergent writers) draw on an additional resource, oral literate language, which builds the foundation for literary expression.
Mr Winsor said many criminal barristers "speak in contemptuous terms of the quality of evidence that is sometimes performed by police officers, barely literate in some respects".
The respondents' answers to the three questions demonstrated that "a discouragingly low number" of Americans could be said to be even minimally financially literate, especially "given the question's simplicity and the fact that respondents did not have to make a calculation but could merely select from a set of answers" (p.
Second, circumstances including state censorship and the use of audio media like radio and television can impede the transition from a more primitive oral society to a literate society.