liquor

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Related to liquors: Liqueurs

liquor

 [lik´er, li´kwor]
1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution, containing medicinal substances.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.
liquor am´nii amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospina´lis cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folli´culi the fluid in the cavity of a developing graafian follicle.
liquor pu´ris the fluid portion of pus.

li·quor

, gen.

li·quor·is

, pl.

li·quo·res

(li'kŏr, -wōr-is, -wō'rēs), [TA] As a Latin word, liquor (as in the phrase liquor folliculi) is pronounced lī'kwōr by speaker of English. As an English word (as in spirituous liquor) it is pronounced lĭk'er.
1. Any liquid or fluid.
See also: solution.
2. A term used for certain body fluids.
See also: solution.
3. The pharmacopoeial term for any aqueous solution (not a decoction or infusion) of a nonvolatile substance and for aqueous solutions of gases.
See also: solution.
[L.]

liquor

/li·quor/ (lik´er) (li´kwor) pl. liquors, liquo´res   [L.]
1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution containing a medicinal substance.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.

liquor am´nii  amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospina´lis  cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folli´culi  follicular fluid.

liquor

[lik′ər]
1 any fluid or liquid, such as liquor amnii, the amniotic fluid.
2 an alcoholic beverage.
A drinkable liquid containing ethanol produced by distilling fermented grain, fruit, or vegetables, which contrasts to undistilled fermented beverages—e.g., beer and wine. Hard liquor is generally used for a spirit with high—e.g., 30%—ethanol content and includes gin, rum, tequila, vodka, and whisky.

liquor

Medtalk A fluid, usually aqueous containing a medicinal. See Herbal liquor Vox populi A beverage with a high–generally > 20%–concentration of ethanol. See Hard liquor.

li·quor

, pl. liquores (līkwōr, lī-kwōrēz) [TA]
1. Any liquid or fluid.
2. A term for certain body fluids.
3. The pharmacopeial term for any aqueous solution (not a decoction or infusion) of a nonvolatile substance and for aqueous solutions of gases.
See also: solution

li·quor

, pl. liquores (līkwōr, lī-kwōrēz) [TA] As a Latin word, liquor is pronounced lī'kwōr. As an English word it is pronounced lik'ĕr.
1. Any liquid or fluid.
2. A term usedfor certain body fluids.
3. Pharmacopoeial term for any aqueous solution of a nonvolatile substance.

liquor

1. a liquid, especially an aqueous solution, containing medicinal substances.
2. a term applied to certain body fluids.

liquor amnii
amniotic fluid.
liquor cerebrospinalis
cerebrospinal fluid.
liquor folliculi
the fluid in the cavity of a developing graafian follicle.
liquor pericardii
pericardial fluid.
liquor pleurae
pleural fluid.

Patient discussion about liquor

Q. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor? My new girl friend requests me to quit liquor. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor?

A. Wine or beer is not safer to drink than liquor. Liquor is liquor. A twelve - ounce beer has the same amount of alcohol as a five - ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 - ounce shot of liquor. It is the amount of ethanol consumed that affects a person most, not the type of alcoholic drink.

Q. Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem? How can I have a drinking problem if I can hold my liquor? Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem?

A. "being able to hold your liquor" is actually the liver gathering forces...let's imagine that our liver is a factory that disables alcohol as a poison. and i have a 100 workers over there. if i'll drink great amount of alcohol my workers will be busy and most of the alcohol will run along in my body. but after a few times i'll hire more workers. then less alcohol will run along my body and i'll disable it fast. same thing in your body.

Q. I drink liquor a lot maybe 4x a week and I love drinking but after a couple days my veins star to hurt...Y? It runs in the familly alcohol and bud but I wish I could go a whole year withought poppin bottles.. what will be perscibed to a alki?

A. FROM ALL THAT DRINKING

More discussions about liquor
References in classic literature ?
There was no money used in this traffic, and, after a time, all payment in spirituous liquors was prohibited, in consequence of the frantic and frightful excesses and bloody brawls which they were apt to occasion.
Again, they drugged their patient with opium and drenched him with intoxicating liquors, hoping that the snake might thus be reduced to stupor and perhaps be ejected from the stomach.
They only took certain moneys which their parents had, and garments that belonged unto their friends, whereby they might remember them when far away; and they took also the dog Ketmehr, which was the property of their neighbor Malchus, because the beast did run his head into a noose which one of the young men was carrying carelessly, and they had not time to release him; and they took also certain chickens that seemed lonely in the neighboring coops, and likewise some bottles of curious liquors that stood near the grocer's window; and then they departed from the city.
Vincy decided questions with trenchant ignorance, especially as to those liquors which were the best inward pickle, preserving you from the effects of bad air.
I do not mean to say that this was why I thought him a finer writer than Dickens, but I will own that it was probably one of the reasons why I liked him better; if I appreciated him so fully as I felt, I must be of a finer porcelain than the earthen pots which were not aware of any particular difference in the various liquors poured into them.
Though I bided my time, ran up a comfortable hotel bill, and, at the very last, ordered my own generous assortment of liquors and cigars and charged the bill to the schooner.
Generically, fiery liquors that produce madness in total
He had found that among muffin-sellers there existed drunkenness, debauchery, and profligacy, which he attributed to the debasing nature of their employment as at present exercised; he had found the same vices among the poorer class of people who ought to be muffin consumers; and this he attributed to the despair engendered by their being placed beyond the reach of that nutritious article, which drove them to seek a false stimulant in intoxicating liquors.
And as for the liquors which accompanied this indigestible repast
The Doctor started for the Lakes yesterday morning, after an interview with the captain of the eleven, in the presence of Thomas, at which he arranged in what school the cricket dinners were to be, and all other matters necessary for the satisfactory carrying out of the festivities, and warned them as to keeping all spirituous liquors out of the close, and having the gates closed by nine o'clock.
The only person behind the counter at which the liquors were served, was a bewildered servant girl, perfectly ignorant of the business.
As for liquors, I found several, cases of bottles belonging to our skipper, in which were some cordial waters; and, in all, about five or six gallons of rack.