liquorrhea

li·quor·rhe·a

(li-kŏ-rē'ă),
The flow of liquid.
[L. liquor, fluid, + G. rhoia, flow]

liquorrhea

An obsolete term for an excess discharge of a normal secretion—e.g., tears, nasal mucus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study we investigated the utility of transferrin as a diagnostic marker for liquorrhea.
Having performed preliminary experiments to test different electrophoretic separation methods, including isoelectric focusing and disc and agarose gel electrophoresis, we set out to ascertain the reproducibility and reliability of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and to demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of transferrin heterogeneity and its superiority to [beta]-trace and transthyretin assessment in the diagnosis of liquorrhea.
In 98 of these cases, liquorrhea occurred as otoliquorrhea and in 75 cases as rhinoliquorrhea.
For control experiments, tears, saliva, and secretions from the nose and ears were obtained from patients without history of liquorrhea.
Liver function tests may therefore be advisable when the differential diagnosis of liquorrhea is assessed.
Earlier studies investigated prostaglandin-D synthase ([beta]-trace protein) for the diagnosis of liquorrhea and various neurologic diseases (21-23).
Particularly in subclinical liquorrhea with a loss of small quantities of CSF, the fistula may not detectable by radiologic imaging.