liquorice


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glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis-i-rī'ză),
The dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra (family Leguminoseae) and allied species; a demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant; also used to disguise the taste of other remedies; its action appears to depend on glycyrrhizic acid, a salt-retaining glycoside that mimics the action of aldosterone.
Synonym(s): licorice, liquorice
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]

liquorice

See licorice.

liquorice

A preparation from the root of a legume, usually Glycyrrhiza glabra, which contains asparagine, betaine, chalcones, choline, coumarins, flavonoids, glycyrrhizin, gums, isoflavonoids and saponins. Liquorice has a high content of glycyrrhizic acid—glucuronic acid + glycyrrhetinic acid—which is structurally similar to steroids, explaining its anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and antirheumatic effects; it is antitussive, demulcent, expectorant, laxative, sedative and reduces serum glucose and cholesterol.
 
Chinese medicine
Liquorice is used topically for abscesses and wounds, and internally for abdominal pain and spasms, alcohol and other intoxications, asthma, cholecystitis, cirrhosis, colds, coughing and wheezing, constipation, diabetes, fever, gastritis, gastric ulcers, heartburn, hepatitis, lung congestion, and sore throat.
 
Herbal medicine
In Western herbal medicine, Glycyrrhiza glabra is used topically for eczema, herpes and skin infections, and internally for arthritis, colic, constipation, cough, gastric ulcers, hepatitis and for many of the same conditions as Chinese medicine.
 
Toxicity
Excess liquorice causes mineralocorticoid excess (e.g., suppresses 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and the RAA axis), with sodium and water retention, hypertension, hypokalemia and myopathy with myoglobulinuria; it should not be used in patients with glaucoma, hypertension, renal disease or pregnancy.

Sexology
Liquorice has an unsubstantiated reputation as an aphrodisiac. Its erotic power is mentioned in the Kama Sutra, and liquorice potions are recommended for “sexual vigour”. Liquorice odours are said to increase blood flow to the genitalia.

glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis'i-rī'ză)
Dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra and allied species; demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant.
Synonym(s): licorice.
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]
References in periodicals archive ?
If you really, really love liquorice as I do, the FDA says: "No matter what your age, don't eat large amounts of black liquorice in one go.
Liquorice, a unique "guide drug" of traditional Chinese medicine: a review of its role in drug interactions.
5mmol/day)She was seen by the Endocrinology team and her history at that time revealed that she had been taking liquorice in sweets for as long as she could remember.
For example, liquorice root Glycyrrhiza contains different substances that help to alleviate disorders of the airways and digestive system.
Panda Liquorice will donate proceeds from the sale of the product towards the care of the duo during their 10-year stay at the Zoo.
According to the Bundesverband der Deutschen SuRwarenindustrie, the association of the German confectionery industry, production of liquorice in Germany in 2008 was 47,500 tonnes with a turnover of Euro 169.
Scientists from Edinburgh University carried out the study in Finland, where liquorice is hugely popular.
The lamb dish also features a teasing pre-cursor of the liquorice that elevates the final dessert of an epic evening to the winner's rostrum: liquorice panna cotta, yoghurt sabayon, carrot sorbet and vanilla brioche croutons.
These, combined with herbs that are soothing to the stomach and gut walls, such as slippery elm, marshmallow root and liquorice, can help heal damage.
Two other products were nominated: Guinness for uses isinglass, a gelatine made from fish bladders, to make the stout clearer and Bassett's Liquorice Allsorts, which contain gelatine made from animal bones.
Glycyrrhizinic acid occurs naturally in the liquorice plant "Glycyrrhiza glabra" while its ammonium salt is manufactured from aqueous extracts of the liquorice plant.