Amniotic fluid

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amniotic

 [am″ne-ot´ik]
pertaining to the amnion.
amniotic band syndrome a condition characterized by isolated or multiple constriction defects of the fingers, toes, limbs, and less frequently the skull, face, or viscera. It results from a tear of unknown etiology in the amnion, which allows amniotic fluid and fetal parts to escape from the amnion into the chorion. When the amnion and chorion are separated, strands from either the maternal amnion or the fetal chorion may entangle fetal parts. As the fetus grows the strands become more constrictive, causing defects.
amniotic fluid the albuminous fluid contained in the amniotic sac; called also liquor amnii and, informally, waters. The fetus floats in this fluid, which serves as a cushion against injury from sudden blows or movements and helps maintain a constant body temperature for the fetus. Normally the fluid is clear and slightly alkaline; discoloration or excessive cloudiness may indicate fetal distress or disease, as in erythroblastosis fetalis in which fluid is usually greenish yellow. The amount varies from 500 to 1500 ml.

An excessive amount of amniotic fluid (more than 2000 ml) is called hydramnios; the amount may be as much as several gallons. The cause of this condition is unknown but it frequently accompanies multiple pregnancy or some congenital defect of the fetus, especially hydrocephalus and meningocele.

An abnormally small amount of amniotic fluid is referred to as oligohydramnios; there may be less than 100 ml of fluid present. The cause is unknown. The condition may produce pressure deformities of the fetus, such as clubfoot or torticollis. Adhesions may result from direct contact of the fetus with the amnion.

Removal of a sample of amniotic fluid from the pregnant uterus is called amniocentesis.

amniotic fluid

a liquid produced by the fetal membranes and the fetus. It surrounds the fetus throughout pregnancy, protecting it from trauma and temperature variations, providing freedom of fetal movements, and helping maintain the fetal oxygen supply. The volume totals about 1000 mL at term. In addition to providing the fetus with physical protection, the amniotic fluid is a medium of active chemical exchange. It is secreted and resorbed by cells lining the amniotic sac at a rate of 500 mL/hr at term and is swallowed, metabolized, and excreted as fetal urine at a rate of 50 mL/hr. Its chemical constituents are those of maternal and fetal plasma in different concentrations. Its pH is close to neutral. Amniotic fluid itself is clear, although desquamated fetal cells and lipids give it a cloudy appearance. Also called aqua amnii.

amniotic fluid

The fluid that surrounds the foetus in the amniotic sac, which cushions it from injury and plays a central role in foetal development; osmolality, sodium, creatinine and urea content of AF and maternal serum are virtually identical.
 
Volume
± 800 mL at birth; specific gravity ±1.008; pH, 7.2.

Amniotic fluid analysis  
Detect: 
• Isoimmunisation of RBCs—Bilirubin levels; 
• Genetic defects—Karyotype foetal cells.
 
Determine foetal maturity—Creatinine, lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio, surfactant.

amniotic fluid

liquor amnioticus Obstetrics The fluid that surrounds the fetus in the amniotic sac, which cushions it from injury and plays a central role in fetal development; osmolality, sodium, creatinine, and urea content of AF and maternal serum are virtually identical Volume ± 800 mL at birth; specific gravity, ±1.008; pH, 7.2

am·ni·on·ic flu·id

, amniotic fluid (am'nē-on'ik flū'id, am'nē-ot'ik)
A liquid within the amnionic sac that surrounds embryo, and later, the fetus and protects it from mechanical injury.
Synonym(s): liquor amnii.

amniotic fluid

A liquid produced by one of the membranes which surround the fetus throughout pregnancy and by fetal urination, in which the fetus floats. The volume of amniotic fluid at full term is usually about 1 litre.

Amniotic fluid

The liquid that surrounds the baby within the amniotic sac. Because it is composed mostly of fetal urine, a low amount of fluid can indicate inadequate placental blood flow to the fetus.

amniotic fluid (am´nēot´ik),

n a serum within the amniotic sac in which the embryo is immersed and cushioned.

amniotic

pertaining to the amnion.

amniotic fluid
the albuminous fluid contained in the amniotic sac.
amniotic plaque
small, 2 to 4 mm diameter, poxlike lesion on the inside of the amnion. Constant on the bovine amnion during the middle trimester and causes no problems nor has any known function.
amniotic sac
the amnion; the sac enclosing the fetus suspended in the amniotic fluid.
amniotic vesicle
see amniotic sac (above). Palpation of the vesicle per rectum in the cow is a common test for pregnancy between the 35th and 65th day of pregnancy.

fluid

1. a liquid or gas; any liquid of the body.
2. composed of molecules which freely change their relative positions without separation of the mass.

allantoic fluid
the fluid contained within the allantois.
amniotic fluid
the fluid within the amnion that bathes the developing fetus and protects it from mechanical injury.
ascitic fluid
see ascites.
fluid balance
a state in which the volume of body water and its solutes (electrolytes and nonelectrolytes) are within normal limits and there is normal distribution of fluids within the intracellular and extracellular compartments. The total volume of body fluids should be about 60% of the body weight, and it should be distributed so that one-third is extracellular fluid and two-thirds intracellular fluid. Although this distribution remains constant in a healthy animal, there is continuous movement of fluid into and out of the various compartments. See also dehydration, water intoxication.
body f's
the fluids within the body, composed of water, electrolytes and nonelectrolytes. The volume and distribution of body fluids vary with age, sex and amount of adipose tissue. Throughout life there is a slow decline in the volume of body fluids; obesity decreases the relative amount of water in the body.
Although the body fluids are continuously in motion, moving in and out of the cells, tissue spaces and vascular system, physiologists consider them to be 'compartmentalized'. Fluid within the cell membranes is called intracellular fluid and comprises about two-thirds of the total body fluids. The remaining one-third is outside the cell and is called extracellular fluid. The extracellular fluid can be further divided into tissue fluid (interstitial fluid), which is found in the spaces between the blood vessels and surrounding cells, and intravascular fluid, which is the fluid component of blood.
The maintenance of a proper balance between the intracellular and extracellular fluid volumes is essential to health. In patients with heart failure and renal failure the balance becomes upset, producing either localized or generalized edema. Excessive fluid loss produces fluid volume deficit causing cellular dehydration and impaired cellular function.
Bouin's fluid
a histological fixative.
cerebrospinal fluid
the fluid contained within the ventricles of the brain, the subarachnoid space, and the central canal of the spinal cord. See also cerebrospinal fluid.
fluid dram
see fluid dram.
fluid extract
a liquid preparation of a vegetable drug, containing alcohol as a solvent or preservative, or both, of such strength that each milliliter contains the therapeutic constituents of 1 gram of the standard drug it represents.
fetal fluid
allantoic plus amniotic fluids.
interstitial fluid
the extracellular fluid bathing the cells in most tissues, excluding the fluid within the lymph and blood vessels.
isotonic fluid
having the same tonicity or osmotic pressure as blood.
lacrimal fluid
aqueous fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands; called also tears.
fluid line
in radiographs, the interface between fluid and gas, as in the gastrointestinal tract, will show as a straight line.
fluid loss
by vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, water deprivation. See dehydration.
fluid mosaic model
the modern concept of the structure of a biological membrane developed by S.J. Singer and G.L. Nicolson. In it the membrane consists of protein molecules partly embedded in a discontinuous bilayer of phospholipids that form the matrix of a mosaic of functional cell units.
fluid ounce
see fluid ounce.
pericardial, pleural, peritoneal fluid
normally present in amounts sufficient only to lubricate the movement of viscera within the respective cavities. Composition similar to blood serum.
fluid replacement
see fluid therapy (below).
fluid restriction
the limitation of oral fluid intake to a prescribed amount for each 24-hour period.
fluid retention
see edema.
spinal fluid
the fluid within the spinal canal.
fluid splashing sounds
audible when gas and fluid are free in a cavity, e.g. abomasum in cases of abomasal displacement; can be elicited by shaking a small animal or part of a large animal (i.e. succussion) or by simultaneous percussion and auscultation.
synovial fluid
synovia.
fluid therapy
aims to replace fluids lost by disease process or by restriction of intake, or to maintain a high rate of fluid excretion to ensure removal of toxins, or to administer therapeutic or anesthetic agents slowly over a long period. The amounts and route of administration vary with the need of the patient. Normal solutions include 5% dextrose and Ringer's solution; alkalinizing fluids include lactated Ringer's and 1.3% sodium bicarbonate; acidifying solutions include isotonic saline and 1.9% ammonium chloride.
fluid thrill
see thrill.
fluid volume deficit
an imbalance in fluid volume in which there is loss of fluid from the body not compensated for by an adequate intake of water. The major causes are: (1) insufficient fluid intake, and (2) excessive fluid loss from vomiting, diarrhea, suctioning of gastric contents, or drainage through operative wounds, burns or fistulae. Decreased volume in the intravascular compartment is called hypovolemia. Because water moves freely between the compartments, extracellular fluid deficit causes intracellular fluid deficit (cellular dehydration), which leaves the cells without adequate water to carry on normal function.
fluid volume excess
an overabundance of water in the interstitial fluid spaces or body cavities (edema) or an excess of fluid within the blood vessels (hypervolemia) and water intoxication.
Factors that contribute to the accumulation of edematous fluid are: (1) dilatation of the arteries, as occurs in the inflammatory process; (2) reduced effective osmotic pressure, as in hypoproteinemia, lymphatic obstruction and increased capillary permeability; (3) increased venous pressure, as in congestive heart failure, thrombophlebitis and cirrhosis of the liver; and (4) retention of sodium due to increased reabsorption of sodium by the renal tubules.
fluid wave
see thrill.

Patient discussion about Amniotic fluid

Q. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor? My new girl friend requests me to quit liquor. Is wine or beer safer to drink than liquor?

A. Wine or beer is not safer to drink than liquor. Liquor is liquor. A twelve - ounce beer has the same amount of alcohol as a five - ounce glass of wine, or 1.5 - ounce shot of liquor. It is the amount of ethanol consumed that affects a person most, not the type of alcoholic drink.

Q. Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem? How can I have a drinking problem if I can hold my liquor? Is holding liquor a sign of a drinking problem?

A. "being able to hold your liquor" is actually the liver gathering forces...let's imagine that our liver is a factory that disables alcohol as a poison. and i have a 100 workers over there. if i'll drink great amount of alcohol my workers will be busy and most of the alcohol will run along in my body. but after a few times i'll hire more workers. then less alcohol will run along my body and i'll disable it fast. same thing in your body.

Q. I drink liquor a lot maybe 4x a week and I love drinking but after a couple days my veins star to hurt...Y? It runs in the familly alcohol and bud but I wish I could go a whole year withought poppin bottles.. what will be perscibed to a alki?

A. FROM ALL THAT DRINKING

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