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lip

 [lip]
1. the upper or lower fleshy margin of the mouth.
2. any liplike part; called also labium.
double lip redundancy of the submucous tissue and mucous membrane of the lip on either side of the median line.
glenoid lip a ring of fibrocartilage joined to the rim of the glenoid cavity.
Hapsburg lip a thick, overdeveloped lower lip that often accompanies Hapsburg jaw.

LIP

Acronym for lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia or lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. See: lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

lip

(lip), [TA]
1. One of the two muscular folds with an outer membrane having a stratified squamous cell epithelial surface layer that bound the mouth anteriorly.
See also: labium, labrum.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
See also: labium, labrum.
Synonym(s): labium (1) [TA]
[A.S. lippa]

lip

(lip)
1. the upper or lower fleshy margin of the mouth.
2. any liplike part; labium.

cleft lip  a congenital cleft or defect in the upper lip.
glenoid lip  a ring of fibrocartilage joined to the rim of the glenoid cavity.
Hapsburg lip  a thick, overdeveloped lower lip that often accompanies Hapsburg jaw.

lip

(lĭp)
n.
1. Anatomy
a. Either of two fleshy structures that surround the opening of the mouth in humans and other mammals.
b. In humans, the smooth brownish to reddish border of the lip.
2. A structure or part that encircles or bounds an orifice, as:
a. Anatomy A labium.
b. The margin of flesh around a wound.
c. Either of the margins of the aperture of a gastropod shell.
d. A rim, as of a vessel, bell, or crater.

lip′less adj.

lip

Etymology: AS, lippa
1 either the upper or lower fleshy structure surrounding the opening of the oral cavity.
2 See also labia. any rimlike structure bordering a cavity or groove.

LIP

lip

(lip) [TA]
1. One of the two muscular folds that encircle the mouth anteriorly; each has an outer mucosa with a stratified squamous epithelial surface layer.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
Synonym(s): labium (1) [TA] .
[A.S. lippa]

lip

  1. (of an embryonic BLASTOPORE) the rim of the blastopore.
  2. (of a flower perianth) a group of perianth segments united to a greater or lesser extent, to form a distinct grouping thus divided from the rest of the perianth.
  3. (of vertebrates) one of two fleshy parts (upper and lower) surrounding the mouth.

lip

(lip) [TA]
1. One of two muscular folds with outer membrane having a stratified squamous cell epithelial surface layer around mouth.
2. Any liplike structure bounding a cavity or groove.
[A.S. lippa]

lip,

n 1. either the upper or lower structure surrounding the opening of the oral cavity.
2. a rimlike structure bordering a cavity or groove.
lip biting,
n an oral habit in which either lip is placed between the teeth with more or less forcible application of the teeth to the lips.
lip, cleft,
n See harelip.
lip, congenital cleft,
n See harelip.
lip, double,
n a redundant fold of tissue on the mucosal side of the upper lip that gives the appearance of a second lip and that may become accentuated by habitually being sucked between the teeth.
lip line, high,
n the greatest height to which the lip is raised in normal function or during the act of smiling broadly.
lip line, low,
n the lowest position of the lower lip during the act of smiling or voluntary retraction. The lowest position of the upper lip at rest.
lip pits (congenital lip fistulas),
n.pl the congenital depressions, usually bilateral and symmetrically placed, on the vermilion portion of the lower lip. These pits may be circular or may be present as a transverse slit. The depression represents a blind fistula that penetrates downward into the lower lip to a depth of 0.5 to 2.5 cm. They often exude viscid saliva on pressure.
lip retractor,
n a device to retract the lips when taking intraoral photographs.
lip, structures of,

lip

1. the upper or lower fleshy margin of the mouth.
2. any fleshy boundary; labium.

lip droop
an unnatural hanging of the lower lip, which is not used during prehension and mastication; there is an accompanying lack of sensitivity of the part. Unilateral droop is usually an indication of facial paralysis; bilateral droop occurs in many conditions of general paralysis, e.g. botulism.
lip fold dermatitis
see fold dermatitis.
lip-leg ulceration
a disease of sheep. See ulcerative dermatosis.
lip philtrum
the vertical median groove or fissure in the upper lip of some mammals.
lip twitch
see twitch.
lip ulcer
see eosinophilic ulcer.
References in classic literature ?
There was pity in her eyes that became laughter on her lips.
His voice was weaker, so I moistened his lips with the brandy again, and he continued, but it seemed as though his memory had gone on working in the interval for his story was further advanced.
said the old father of the bride-groom, as he carried to his lips a glass of wine of the hue and brightness of the topaz, and which had just been placed before Mercedes herself.
Not a word more," interrupted the chair; "here I close my lips for the next hundred years.
His auditors, it may be, never suspected that Ernest, their own neighbor and familiar friend, was more than an ordinary man; least of all did Ernest himself suspect it; but, inevitably as the murmur of a rivulet, came thoughts out of his mouth that no other human lips had spoken.
A big art event hangs on your lips, my dear, great Rita.
He suited the action to the word, and whistled a line of "Take, O take those lips away.
He dragged himself toward the car, on his knees; he glared at the bottle containing the precious fluid; he gave one wild, eager glance, seized the treasured store, and bore it to his lips.
From the lips of the ape-man broke a rumbling growl of warning.
Rokoff had been in to see and revile and abuse him several times during the afternoon; but he had been able to wring no word of remonstrance or murmur of pain from the lips of the giant captive.
Bertrade de Montfort did not know how to answer so ridiculous a sophistry; and, truth to tell, she was more than pleased to hear from the lips of Roger de Conde what bored her on the tongues of other men.
He sucked in his lips for a moment with a slight gurgling sound.