lipreading


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lipreading

A means of communication with the deaf. English speech involves more than forty distinct sounds but less than ten visibly distinguishable mouth patterns can be reliably identified. Other facial, bodily and contextual clues are, however, provided and a skilled lipreader can often discern or infer 60% of spoken information.
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The results suggest that lipreading success depends on a person's ability to "hear" the words formed by moving lips, Saalasti said.
Rob Burley, head of public affairs and campaigns at Action on Hearing Loss, said: "One in six of us have some form of hearing loss, and lipreading classes provide life changing support and new skills.
Around 500,000 people in Wales are deaf or hard of hearing but there are currently very few qualified lipreading tutors.
The findings follow the release of the charity's new Paying Lip Service report, which looked at the barriers preventing people with hearing loss from accessing lipreading classes throughout England and Wales.
1998) Early lipreading ability and speech and language development in hearing-impaired pre-schoolers.
A selection of equipment to help people in their homes; Vicky and Ron enjoy a meat out with the Holyhead Lipreading Group; Angela and Alistair at an information event delivered in their preferred language - British Sign Language; Kyle checks out the equipment with Technical Officer, Jackie Claydon
An unstoppable force of nature, her adventures lipreading the bad guys' conversations for the FBI were grist for a cable TV series called "Sue Thomas: F.
However, speechreading performance was 97% correct when augmented with audible speech as tested at the word level with The Craig Lipreading Inventory (Craig, 1964/1990).
Wonderfully unlikely turns of phrase appear like bits of brilliant but nonchalant cocktail conversation: "The buffalo of philosophy"; "a jaw of pines and water towers"; "Day is a fine discrimination to get away with / lipreading through the moving leaves"; "Schoolkids jumping the jellyfish fences / Wearing cranberry jackets / Through the paisley briars and stars / In starred wire.
Psychological applications include visual recognition of letters and/or digits (Townsend, 1971), visual recognition of textures (Cho, Yang, & Hallett, 2000), lipreading tasks (Manning & Shofner, 1991), auditory recognition tasks (Morgan, Chambers, & Morton, 1973), taste recognition (Hettinger, Gent, Marks, & Frank, 1999), odor discrimination (Kent, Youngentob, & Sheehe, 1995), and tactile recognition (Vega-Bermudez, Johnson, & Hsiao, 1991).
There is a desperate shortage of lipreading teachers in many areas of the UK.