lipid bilayer


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Related to lipid bilayer: phospholipid, Liposomes, fluid mosaic model

lipid bilayer

The two layers of phospholipid molecules included within the outer membrane of most cells. These layers are arranged so their two hydrophilic (water-soluble) sides face the interior and the exterior of the cell, and their hydrophobic (nonpolar) core is in between. The membrane is relatively impermeable to molecules such as glucose and amino acids but very permeable to lipid-soluble molecules such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and alcohol.
See: cell for illus
See also: bilayer
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientists then coated the carbon nanotube transistor with a lipid bilayer, basically a double wall of oil molecules that cells use to separate their insides from their environment.
LpX is a unique Lp characterized by a vesicular structure that consists of a lipid bilayer of 30-70nm that encloses an aqueous compartment.
The lipid bilayer is a self-assemblying structure with temperature-dependent properties.
It is speculated that monounsaturated fatty acids interfere with the calcium dynamics of follicular keratinocytes and the intercellular lipid bilayer.
The lipid bilayer structures of liposomes mimic the barrier properties of biomembranes, and therefore they offer the potential of examining the behavior of membranes of a known composition.
They began by using sulfur atoms to bond an artificial lipid bilayer -- a synthetic membrane -- to a substrate coated with an ultra-thin layer of gold to form an electrode.
Objective: "Cellular compartments are separated by membranes composed of a lipid bilayer with embedded proteins.
1H-NMR measurements of lipid molecular mobility in liposomes containing chromanols, and fluorescence measurements which reveal the uniformity of distribution (clusterizations) of chromanols in the lipid bilayer.
Results: The proton acceptor component of surface energy was shown to correlate quantitatively with the hydration density of the lipid bilayer and its optional PEG cover.
It is known that molality of creatinine in erythrocyte fluid is equal to molality in plasma (2) and that creatinine is transported by passive diffusion through the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte membrane (3).
Up close, this web of proteins and fatty acids, a lipid bilayer, resembles a molecular thicket.
The two key technologies needed to unravel how protein clustering and the biophysical properties of the lipid bilayer regulate specific interactions at the molecular level have now been developed.