linear dose-response

linear dose-response

A consistent increase in biological response as increased quantities of a test substance are administered.

linear dose-response

Therapeutics A consistent ↑ in biologic response as ↑ quantities of a test substance are administered
References in periodicals archive ?
Editor's Note: The combined data support a role for magnesium in reducing risk of [type II diabetes], with a statistically significant linear dose-response pattern within the reference dose range of dietary intake among Asian and US populations.
This adherence to linear dose-response ideology produces confusion in the face of conflicting results.
When a "substance" produces effects that are proportional to the dose given, that is called a linear dose-response, because a graph of response vs.
The linear dose-response relationship showed the risk of stroke decreased by 32% (0.
A key question is whether the recent epidemiological literature supports estimates of cancer risk predicted from linear dose-response models.
Cadmium, diesel, lead, manganese, mercury, methylene chloride, and nickel showed roughly linear dose-response relationships between concentration and odds ratio of ASD.
Like most other scientists studying BPA,' we do not see a straightforward linear dose-response relationship," she said.
The findings suggest that "if the association between stroke and pollution is causal and a linear dose-response occurs, a 2-mcg/[m.
Although the observed relative risk of stroke was modest, the findings suggest that "if the association between stroke and pollution is causal and a linear dose-response occurs, a 2-mi-crogram/m3 reduction in mean PM2 5 levels (approximately 20%) during this time period might have averted approximately 6,100 of the 184,000 stroke hospitalizations observed in the U.
The linear dose-response relationship of the LPA variants with both the Lp(a) lipoprotein level and the risk of coronary disease provided compelling support for a causal role of an elevated plasma level of Lp(a) lipoprotein and the risk of coronary disease," the researchers said.
The meta-analysis of data from 2,274 women with breast cancer and 2,268 controls without breast cancer indicated a linear dose-response gradient between serum 25(OH)D levels and the risk of breast cancer.
Given our opinion, we further believe that the actual risk from low-level exposure is likely to be much less than EPA's linear dose-response model indicates.

Full browser ?