linamarin


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linamarin

the toxic cyanogenetic glycoside in linseed and flax. See also linatine, linum.
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The cyanogenic glycosides linamarin and lotaustralin are known to be precursor compounds to the liberation of HCN on hydrolysis in cassava tissues.
It contains cyanogenic glucosides (CNG), both linamarin and lotaustralin (Ikediobi et al.
During the consequent fermentation, roots are softened, the disintegration of the tissue structures result in the contact of linamarin with linamarase and subsequent hydrolysis to glucose and cyanohydrins which easily break down to ketone and hydrocyanic acid (Cooke, 1978).
Linamarin Which Contains a Very Low Amount of Hydrocyanic.
The flavonoids apigenin-6,8-di-C-[beta]-D-glucopyranoside (vicenin-2) and linamarin which have been isolated from the leaves (Thieme and Khogali, 1974; Secor et al.
However, it contains a cyanogenic glucoside, linamarin, that is hydrolyzed in two steps: the linamarin is first hydrolyzed to acetone cyanohydrin and glucose (catalyzed by the enzyme linamarase), and then the acetone cyanohydrin is hydrolyzed to acetone and hydrogen cyanide (HCN).
2]; Ajax Chemicals], linamarin (Sigma Chemical), and bovine serum albumin (Nutritional Biochemical) were used.
Drying or ensiling cassava leaves and sweet potato vines reduces a number of these nutritionally active factors including linamarin (Padmaja, 1989; Cardoso et al.
However, cassava foliage, especially fresh cassava, contains cyanogenic glucosides, linamarin and lotaustralin.
Hydrolysis of the cyanogenic glycosides amygdalin, prunasin and linamarin by ruminal microorganisms.
However, cassava foliage especially fresh cassava foliage contains cyanogenic glucosides, linamarin and lotaustralin.