limnology

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lim·nol·o·gy

(lim-nol'ŏ-jē),
Study of the physical, chemical, meteorologic, and biologic conditions in fresh water; a branch of ecology.
[G. limnē, pool, + logos, study]

limnology

(lĭm-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the life and phenomena of fresh water, especially lakes and ponds.

lim′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
lim′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
lim·nol′o·gist n.

limnology

(lĭm-nŏl′ō-jē) [Gr. limne, pool, + logos, study]
The scientific study of fresh water in the environment (i.e., potability, pH, degree of pollution, mineral content, and variation with seasonal and climatic changes).

limnology

the study of freshwater bodies, such as ponds, lakes, streams and their inhabitants.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major chosen generally determines the type of work a limnologist will do, as well as his or her occupational title.
Limnologists are scientists who study the characteristics of freshwater systems such as lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, and wetlands.
Environmental scientists, ecologists, fisheries biologists, natural resources specialists, and biogeochemists--all can be limnologists.
Limnologists work both in the field and in the laboratory.
Limnologists, geographers, geologists, ethnic specialists, agricultural and soil specialists, experts on air and water pollution, engineers, and forestry experts were to be included in the group.
By comparing the productivity and chlorophyll levels of lakes receiving different rates of nutrient input, it was possible for limnologists to develop rather specific operational definitions for lakes that were considered oligotrophic (slightly productive), mesotrophic (moderately productive), eutrophic (highly productive), and hypertrophic or dystrophic (so productive that normal lake trophic structure and biogeochemical cycles were severely disturbed).
Most limnologists would agree that although many sophisticated chemical analyses are available for assessing the productivity of freshwaters, biological tests are necessary for an effective evaluation.
Studied by limnologists from UC Davis for 29 years, Castle Lake now serves as a "control' for gauging the clarity and health of Lake Tahoe.
The only complaints have been heard from limnologists who have difficulties reading graphs unless the independent variable is presented along the y-axis, with the highest value at the top (this makes the graph look like a lake).
The result is a fine reference for field biologists and limnologists as well as for advanced students.
Some limnologists (lake scientists), among them Daniel Livingstone at Duke University in Durham, N.