liming


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

liming

the addition of calcium compounds to the soil, producing three main effects:
  1. the provision of the major element calcium,
  2. the neutralizing of acid soils,
  3. the promotion of flocculation (clumping) of clay particles into larger crumbs, so as to encourage aeration and drainage.

liming

addition of lime to a pasture or crop field as a fertilizer and soil conditioner.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results suggest that liming made subtle changes to the availability of soil P at Merredin; shoot P concentration and total P uptake at anthesis tended to be higher in the +lime than the -lime treatment (data not shown), although these differences were not significant (P> 0.
Liming reduced extractable Al at most increments of soil depth measured to 100 cm.
This is particularly important in the case of managing pH by liming, which is the topic of this chapter.
Liming is synonymous with raising soil pH, although adding limestone (CaC[O.
Secondary treatments included liming one plot from each of the unburned and burned areas.
As expected, exchangeable Ca levels are somewhat greater for those plots receiving liming treatments.
Aitken (1992) indicated that the lime required to reduce exchangeable Al to a predetermined level far exceeded that calculated using 1 M KCl, even when multiplied by a liming factor of 1.
Since the lime requirement of soil depends on the initial soil pH, the BC (-which in itself results from a combination of chemical reactions) of the soil, and the reasons for liming, it is unlikely that measures of exchangeable Al alone will provide adequate predictions of lime requirement.
This is the first watershed liming in the United States, and the first anywhere to involve lots of careful measurements," says project manager Donald Porcella, of the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, Calif.
Harald Sverdrup, a chemical engineer and liming expert from the Lund (Sweden) Institute of Technology, cautions that "liming doesn't solve all [ecosystem] problems -- just a suite of the worst.
1984), and an apparent increase in the rate of acidification after liming (Doerge and Gardner 1985; Rowe and Johnson 1988).
The amount of lime which can be accounted for is lime recovered plus the amount which would have been removed by re-acidification or leaching during the period between liming and collecting the soil samples.