lime

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lime

 [līm]
1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity.
2. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia, which contains ascorbic acid.

lime

(līm),
1. an alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime). Synonym(s): calcium oxide, calx (1)
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[O.E. līm, birdlime]

lime

(līm)
1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline and caustic earth, CaO; having various industrial uses and also a pharmaceutic necessity.
2. the acid fruit of the tropical tree, Citrus aurantifolia; its juice contains ascorbic acid.

soda lime  see under soda.

lime

Etymology: AS, lim
1 any of several oxides and hydroxides of calcium. The various kinds of lime have many uses, including the treatment of sewage, the purification of water and refining of sugar, and the manufacture of materials such as plaster and fertilizers.
2 a citrus fruit yielding a juice with a high ascorbic acid content. Lime juice was one of the first effective agents to be used in the treatment of scurvy. See also ascorbic acid, scurvy.

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish-white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it becomes converted into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica, which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as an antiscorbutic agent.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]

lime

(līm)
1. An alkaline earth oxide occurring in grayish white masses (quicklime); on exposure to the atmosphere it converts into calcium hydrate and calcium carbonate (air-slaked lime); direct addition of water to calcium oxide produces calcium hydrate (slaked lime).
Synonym(s): calx (1) .
2. Fruit of the lime tree, Citrus medica (family Rutaceae), which is a source of ascorbic acid and acts as a therapeutic antiscorbutic agent in treating scurvy.
[A.S. līm, birdlime]

lime

1. calcium oxide, a corrosively alkaline earth, used for absorbing carbon dioxide from air.
2. agricultural lime, feed lime and chalk, which are all calcium carbonate. Lime for building mortar is calcium hydroxide; quick lime is calcium oxyhydroxide.
3. the acid fruit of Citrus aurantifolia.

chlorinated lime, chloride of lime
a disinfectant and antiseptic with properties similar to chlorine. Contains at least 30% available chlorine which is quickly inactivated by organic material. Called also bleaching powder. In combination with sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, it forms dakin's solution which is used for wound disinfection.
sulfurated lime
lime water
a saturated aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide.
References in periodicals archive ?
TREE-MENDOUS EFFORT West Jesmond Primary School pupils Feezan Ghafoor and Jake Reed teamed up with Friends of Newcastle Trees to plant lime trees in various parts of the city
Dad-of-four Andrew Currie, 41, who lives on a neighbouring street, was driven out of Lime Trees Terrace after a string of arson attacks in the area.
He said we have one of the few examples of lime trees in the North-east.
A type of topiary, pleaching is the weaving together and trimming of the small branches of certain kinds of trees and bushes to bring them into a regular shape, the lime tree being ideal.
STREET PROTEST: Fourteen-year-old Kaytie McFadden and neighbour Angela McMahon stand in front of other Bray Lane residents during the Save Our Tree campaign, which failed to persuade the city council to call a halt to their plan to chop down the row of lime trees.
Dee Cobb and her husband Alan were so concerned about the nuisance posed by the lime trees this summer that they called on the council to take action.
AS we come to the end of our fruit tree pruning, we move onto the mammoth task of pruning our ``pleached'' lime tree avenues on either side of the main lawns in front of the house.
A set of Small-leaved Lime trees are being studied in Kilton Valley, near Skinningrove, and experts believe they could date back to medieval times.
One of the prints also shows the lime trees by the pond and you can clearly see that one row at the back is growing tall and the inner row has been pol larded -the tops have been cut out.
A petition from 39 of the 92 residents of St Laurence Avenue asked for the mature lime trees in their street to be replaced by an avenue of a blossoming variety.
You may see pol larded willows along river banks where they were planted to strengthen the banks with their masses of fine roots,or in towns where the lime trees along the streets are regularly cut back.
Embarrassed council chiefs have now vowed to ensure the remaining eight lime trees are planted before the end of the year to complete the picturesque avenue in Burnside Park, Overslade.