Zantedeschia aethiopica

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Zantedeschia aethiopica

member of the plant family Araceae; toxin is calcium oxalate raphide crystals; causes stomatitis, salivation. Called also arum lily, calla lily, varkoor.
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Lily of the Nile was an exception, exhibiting some injury in the starvation tests.
Less often seen, but deserving of wider planting, are the Bulbinellas and Bulbines, whose butter-yellow flower spikes would be an excellent complement to lily of the Nile and society garlic.
PALMDALE -- Many Southland homeowners consider ornamental agapanthus, popularly called lily of the Nile, and lemon and avocado trees must-haves.
Lily of the Nile blooms in late spring and early summer and, as a cut flower, does well in vase arrangements.
The lily of the Nile, a clumping perennial with big balls of white or blue flowers on a long stem is both showy and tough.
During the course of our conversation we learned that most garden experts think the classically tall Lily of the Nile (also known as agapanthus) is becoming passe.
Other good choices for beginners are Iceland poppies, pansies, pride of Madeira, lemon trees (they're easier than oranges), lily of the Nile flowers (or their miniature version called Peter Pan) and pink Indian hawthorn, a shrub that blooms in the spring with showy pink flowers.