light therapy


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light therapy

Etymology: AS, leoht + Gk, therapeia, treatment
the use of natural light or light of specified wavelengths to treat disease. This may include ultraviolet light, colored light, or low-intensity laser light. The eye is generally the initial entry point for the light because of its direct connection to the brain through the retinal hypothalamic pathway, which affects the autonomic nervous system and endocrine function. Light therapy has been used primarily for attention deficit disorders, cataracts, conjunctivitis, headaches, head trauma, hyperactivity, lazy eye, macular degeneration, migraine, night blindness, poor eyesight, stroke, and vision disorders. It has also been effective in treating eczema, fever, psoriasis, addictions, allergies, anxiety, autism, bronchitis, childbirth, glaucoma, insomnia, muscle spasm, premenstrual syndrome, stress, and strep throat. Light therapy complements many other treatments for these and other conditions.
The use of certain segments—in particular, the visible range—of the electromagnetic spectrum as a therapeutic modality. Light therapy may act via the hypothalamus, which releases neurotransmitters and releasing factors, after receiving impulses from retina
Formats Full spectrum light—e.g., sunlight, bright light—2 to 10,000 lux, UV light, coloured light, haemoirradiation
Fringe medicine No peer-reviewed data support claims that light therapy is effective in treating AIDS, alcoholism, Alzheimer’s disease, arthalgia, asthma, bulimia, cancer, depression, drug abuse, dysmenorrhea, fatigue, hair loss, headaches, high cholesterol, hostility, immune dysfunction, infections, insomnia, strokes, tooth decay, or other conditions
Mainstream medicine Intense light therapy may be effective for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and shiftwork-related sleep disorders

light therapy

1. The use of certain segments–in particular, the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum as a therapeutic modality; LT may to act via the hypothalamus, which releases neurotransmitters and releasing factors, after receiving impulses from retina Formats Full spectrum light–eg, sunlight, bright light–2 to 10,000 lux, UV light, colored light, hemoirradiation Mainstream medicine LT may be effective in seasonal affective disorder–SAD, and shiftwork-related sleep disorders. See Bright light therapy.
2. Bright light therapy, see there.
3. Heliotherapy, see there.

light ther·a·py

(līt thār'ă-pē)
The therapeutic use of ultraviolet, colored, and laser lights to reestablish diurnal rhythms and alleviate pain and depression.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cosmetic Benefits Of LED Light Therapy Include:?
A Cochrane systematic review of 20 studies (N=620) showed the effectiveness of combined light therapy and pharmacotherapy in treating nonseasonal MDD, but found no benefit to light used as a monotherapy.
Despite its remarkable effectiveness, safety profile, and affordability, light therapy remains for the most part underappreciated and underused.
Light therapy was the first successful treatment in psychiatry based on neurobiological principles.
Supporters of light therapy say SAD is underdiagnosed because doctors often take a snapshot of a patient's current mood and prescribe an antidepressant, rather than examine a yearslong history to identify a seasonal trend.
The main principle of light therapy is circadian rhythm and melatonin secretion regulation (Sloane et al 2007; Terman 2007; Chesson et al 1999).
The trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of low level light therapy (LLLT) for promoting hair growth in males diagnosed with androgenetic alopecia of the head.
According to Lam1 based on his observations, research and literature review, initial use of light therapy in psychiatry arose from circadian rhythm hypotheses for seasonal and non-seasonal depression.
PHOENIX--When patients' sleep cycles are out of synch with the rest of the world, melatonin and light therapy can be helpful.
PHOENIX - When patients' sleep cycles are out of synch with the rest of the world, melatonin and light therapy can help.
Clinical studies show that bright light therapy helps about eight in 10 people with winter depression.
Last year the Mayo Clinic reported that light therapy "is safe and has few side effects.