ligature


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ligature

 [lig´ah-chur]
any material, such as a thread or wire, used in surgery to tie off blood vessels to prevent bleeding, or to treat abnormalities in other parts of the body by constricting the tissues; see also strangulation. Ligatures are used both inside and outside the body. If one must be left within the body after an operation, the type used will usually be of animal tissue or synthetic material that will dissolve or become incorporated in the patient's own body tissue. Those used on the outside of the body for stitches of cuts or incisions can be of any durable material and are removed after they have served their purpose. Special instruments have been developed for the application of ligatures to parts of the body that are difficult for the surgeon's hands to reach or to work in.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chūr),
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
[L. ligatura, a band or tie, fr. ligo, to tie]

ligature

/lig·a·ture/ (lig´ah-cher) any material, such as thread or wire, used for tying a vessel or to constrict a part.
(A), Occluding ligature, which occludes the blood supply to distal tissue; (B), terminal ligature, which is applied to the transected end of a vessel.

ligature

(lĭg′ə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. The act of tying or binding.
2.
a. A cord, wire, or bandage used for tying or binding.
b. A thread, wire, or cord used in surgery to close vessels or tie off ducts.
c. Something that unites; a bond.
3. A character, letter, or unit of type, such as æ, combining two or more letters.
4. Music
a. A group of notes intended to be played or sung as one phrase.
b. A curved line indicating such a phrase; a slur.
c. A passage of notes sung by repeating the same syllable.
d. A metal band that attaches the reed to the mouthpiece of the clarinet and related instruments.
tr.v. liga·tured, liga·turing, liga·tures
To ligate.

ligature

[lig′əchər]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a suture.
2 a wire, as used in orthodontics.

ligature

Surgery
1. A material–silk, gut, wire, etc used to ligate.
2. A tissue plus the ligating material.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel, the pedicle of a tumor, or other structure to constrict it.
2. orthodontics A wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.

ligature

Any thread-like surgical material tied tightly round any structure. Ligatures are commonly made of absorbable material, such as catgut or collagen, but may be non-absorbable.

lig·a·ture

(lig'ă-chŭr)
1. In orthodontics, a wire or other material used to secure an orthodontic attachment or tooth to an archwire.
2. A thread, wire, fillet, or the like, tied tightly around a blood vessel or other structure to constrict it.

ligature (lig´əchur),

n 1. a cord, thread, or fine wire tied around teeth for the purpose of holding a rubber dam in place on retained teeth with fractured roots or split crowns or on teeth that have been replanted.
2. a wire or threadlike substance used to tie a tooth to an orthodontic appliance or to another tooth.
ligature, grass-line,
n a type composed of the fibers of a grass-cloth plant (ramie); used for minor tooth movement. It depends for its activation in movement on the property of shrinkage of the ligature when it is wet by the saliva of the patient.
ligature, steel,
n a type, available as steel filaments in several useful diameters.

ligature

any material, such as a thread or wire, used in surgery to tie off blood vessels to prevent bleeding, or to treat abnormalities in other parts of the body by constricting the tissues.

cruciate ligature
one in which the ligature material is passed around the vessel and surrounding tissue twice before being tied.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the curtain is removed by causing the break-away fasteners to release, the material can be used as a ligature in other ways such as tying a knot in the material and placing it over the top of a door and closing the door.
An audit of ligature points across Hywel Dda Health Board had noted that from September 2009 there had been two "successful self-strangulation events" using en suite bathroom doors and seven attempted hangings.
This custody suite was inherently unsafe due to the age of its fabric, and staff were not trained or equipped to identify the full range of ligature points that we found," the inspectors said.
We weighed (g) each nestling before applying the ligature and returned nestlings to their nest within 10 min.
A ligature was made and force applied for a considerable period of time," he stated.
The Fortissimo Padded Tensing Ring Ligature secures a reed to a mouthpiece with minimal contact.
However, pathologist Dr Sam Kiber said it was possible Ms Evans, of Nant Y Coed, Troedyrhiw, Merthyr, had suffered an epileptic fit which could have tightened the ligature.
n At HMP Wymott in Preston, David Strike, 28, from the Greater Manchester area was found hanged with a ligature made of bed sheets at around 5.
A well-defined ligature injury mark encompassed Stephanie's neck and several marks at the rear base of her neck gave the appearance that a garrote-type device was used in conjunction with the ligature.
It was agreed that the appropriate method is for a surgeon to apply a "double" ligature.
An essay by historian Shelley Rice rehashes a lot of the material in the individual entries in order to create some ligature.
The exhibits of "Ursa the Bear Lady" from India, the Chinaman's long queue, a living Chinese beauty with feet of two and half inches long, the performing Siamese twins joined by a ligature at midtorso were all packaged as abnormal in bodies, clothes, and cultures.