lifetime risk


Also found in: Acronyms.

lifetime risk

Epidemiology The likelihood of suffering a particular condition during the lifespan of an average person, X
References in periodicals archive ?
Women with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome have a 50% increased lifetime risk of breast cancer and increased risk of ovarian, uterine, and cervical cancer.
Edward Gregg, study leader and chief of the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, "Soaring rates of diabetes since the late 1980s and longer overall life expectancy in the general population have been the main drivers of the striking increase in the lifetime risk of diabetes over the last 26 years.
In 2007, the American Cancer Society recommended MRI as an adjunct to mammography for the screening of breast cancer in women who have a lifetime risk of breast cancer of approximately 20-25 percent or greater as determined by models based on family history such as the Gail test.
9% of the patients, whose lifetime risk of social anxiety was nearly six times greater than the risk among controls (OR, 5.
But with her cigarette smoking, hypertension, and low HDL--in addition to her elevated LDL level--she has two or more major risk factors, so her lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease is 50%, he said.
Researchers may be able to separate those whose lifetime risk exceeds 80 per cent from women whose risk is about 20 to 50 per cent.
A lifetime risk of developing osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is about 46%, and the lifetime risk of developing OA of the hip is 25%.
The scientists found that low levels of midlife fitness are associated with marked differences in the lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.
Most breast cancers are not due to inherited faulty genes and do not affect the lifetime risk for other relatives.
The study was the first to look at the lifetime risk of heart disease in both men and women from different ethnic backgrounds.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that while an individual's risk of heart disease may be low in the next five or 10 years, the lifetime risk could still be very high, findings that could have implications for both clinical practice and public health policy.
Although a person's risk of heart disease might be low during the next five to 10 years, the lifetime risk could still be very high.