lifestyle drug

(redirected from lifestyle drugs)
A prescription drug that allows its user to perform an activity ‘on demand’ or without consequences, ameliorate an imprudent binge, or modify effects of ageing

lifestyle drug

Popular health A prescription agent that allows its user to perform an activity 'on demand' or without consequences, ameliorate an imprudent binge, or modify effects of aging
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The movement and purchase of lifestyle drugs and dietary supplements has become higher than ever.
Wenger recently disclosed that one possible reason that Arsenal has been losing so many players is that they could be taking lifestyle drugs without the clubs knowledge.
of Minnesota, this volume analyzes advertisements for lifestyle drugs presented for disorders like depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and sexual dysfunction.
He told Gulf News earlier that lifestyle drugs are more profitable to the companies.
Outlines the benefits and risks to healthcare consumers looking for self-medication, discreet medical consultation and prescriptions for medication to treat embarrassing conditions and chronic ailments as well as providing access to lifestyle drugs
and (3) Is there a correlation between the use of psychotropic lifestyle drugs (defined as widespread nonprescription psychotropic substances, see Table 2) and prescription or illegal neuroenhancers?
The US Food and Drug Administration evaluated all of them in an identical manner to drugs for conditions such as cancer and heart disease, which is why the agency refuses to classify them as lifestyle drugs, agency spokeswoman Sandy Walsh said.
Women were the first to be targeted by so-called lifestyle drugs that turned natural events like menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause into medical conditions.
And it's not just lifestyle drugs such as Viagra or weight-loss pills which are being bought and sold online.
But critics say Americans are becoming too dependent overall -- especially on feel-good, lifestyle drugs.
A thriving industry had already grown around the use of cosmetic surgery and lifestyle drugs, he pointed out.
As in Britain, lifestyle drugs make up the bulk of the illegal trade, but US probes have also uncovered bogus versions of more sophisticated medicines, such as anaemia drug EPO, which is given to cancer and transplant patients, and human growth hormone, which is prescribed for some people with AIDS.