lifespan


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life·span

(līf'span),
1. The duration of life of an individual.
See also: longevity.
2. The normal or average duration of life of members of a given species.
See also: longevity.

lifespan

also

life span

(līf′spăn′)
n.
1. A lifetime.
2. The average or maximum length of time an organism, material, or object can be expected to survive or last.

lifespan

Longevity Epidemiology The genetically endowed limit to life for a person, if free of exogenous risk factors. See Average lifespan, Life expectancy.

lifespan

(līf′span″)
The time beginning with the birth of an organism to the time of its death.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of monthly intravenous injections of 1 million human adipose-derived stem cells into 10-month old rats until their death, cognitive function such as learning and memory improved and lifespan was extended by 31.
LifeSpan adheres to its industry certification standards, like e-Stewards and ISO14001, and OSHA credits the company with surpassing those requirements.
Everybody assumes that lifespan grew much faster in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and is growing much slower now.
Once you hit an average lifespan of 75, however, the pace slows down to three months per year, the same as in the developed countries.
But we think that lifespan extension from dietary restriction is more likely to be a laboratory artefact," Dr Adler said.
What they found, explains Jafari, is the "Rhodiola actually increases lifespan on top of that of dietary restriction.
The scientists gave one of two different doses of metformin to middle-aged male mice and found that lower doses increased lifespan by about five percent, and also delayed the onset of age-associated diseases.
Rehabilitation and installation crews like how easily they can handle the Lifespan frame, as the 24-in.
And "to exclude genetic factors that could have affected the lifespan, we compared the lifespan of eunuchs with multiple Yan-ban families.
The finding seems to support theories that male sex hormones contribute to a shorter lifespan, three researchers from Inha University, Korea University and the National Institute of Korean History wrote in a paper published in the journal Current Biology.
SIECUS promotes a broad, holistic framework for sexual health and well-being throughout the lifespan.
TNS first approached LifeSpan to perform a study involving TNS's proprietary Ergothioneine Transporter (ETT; human gene symbol SLC22A4) which it acquired from the University of Cologne in 2010.