licorice


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licorice

 [lik´ah-ris]
glycyrrhiza; the dried rhizome, roots, and stolons of various species of the perennial herb Glycyrrhiza glabra, used as a flavoring agent for various substances including drugs, tobacco, and candy. It has mineralocorticoid effects and can cause sodium and water retention and hypokalemia.

glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis-i-rī'ză),
The dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra (family Leguminoseae) and allied species; a demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant; also used to disguise the taste of other remedies; its action appears to depend on glycyrrhizic acid, a salt-retaining glycoside that mimics the action of aldosterone.
Synonym(s): licorice, liquorice
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]

licorice

/lic·o·rice/ (lik´ah-ris) glycyrrhiza; the dried rhizome, roots, and stolons of various species of the perennial herb Glycyrrhiza, used as an expectorant and for the treatment of gastritis; also used in traditional Chinese medicine, ayurveda, and folk medicine.

licorice

an herb that grows in shrub form in many subtropical areas.
uses It is used for allergies, arthritis, asthma, constipation, esophagitis, gastritis, hepatitis, inflammatory conditions, peptic ulcers, poor adrenal function, and poor appetite. Its efficacy for these indications is not proven, but its active ingredients (glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid) alter prostaglandin synthesis, are agonists at mineralocorticoid receptors, and prolong the half-life of cortisol.
contraindications Licorice should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in children, or in those with known hypersensitivity. It is also contraindicated in people with liver disease, renal disease, hypokalemia, hypertension, arrhythmias, and congestive heart failure.

glyc·yr·rhi·za

(glis'i-rī'ză)
The dried rhizome and root of Glycyrrhiza glabra and allied species; a demulcent, mild laxative, and expectorant; also used to disguise the taste of other remedies.
Synonym(s): licorice, liquorice.
[G. fr. glykys, sweet, + rhiza, root]

licorice (liˑ·k·rish),

n Latin name:
Glycyrrhiza glabra; parts used: rhizomes, roots; uses: in Ayurveda, pacifies vata and pitta doshas (sweet, heavy, oily), laxative, asthma, malaria, hepatitis, gastric complaints, chronic fatigue, antiinflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral activities; precautions: patients with hepatic conditions, kidney disease, hypokalemia, hypertension, arrhythmias, congestive heart disease; patients taking antiarrhythmics, antihypertensives, cardiac glycosides, corticosteroids, diuretics, hypokalemia. Also called
Chinese licorice, licorice root, madhuka, mulethi, Persian licorice, Russian licorice, Spanish licorice, sweet root, or
yashtimadhu.
Enlarge picture
Licorice.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of licorice in H.
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Licorice and its related products were widely used in China and throughout the world according to an analysis on the imported/exported amount of licorice and its related products in 2009.
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Panda licorice - which has a string of celebrity fans, including former Liverpool FC star Sami Hyypia - has been in the UK for 25 years.
The company's new Licorice Twists come in 5-ounce packages and offer a generous five links per 130-calorie serving.
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We've teamed up with Panda Licorice to give readers the chance to win a stunning break in cultural Helsinki.
WE'VE teamed up with Panda Licorice so one lucky reader will win a stunning break for two people in cultural Helsinki.