licentious

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licentious

adjective A poetic (i.e., non-medical) term referring to the lack of sexual restraint or boundaries; sexually uninhibited.
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They wanted what would amount to a right to licentiousness, a right to tailor the law to their personal faith.
Unless otherwise noted, each of the following state analyses involve a state constitution that contains language similar to New York's article I, section 3 (hereinafter "public safety and licentiousness clauses").
A rigid commitment to the truth, such as was insisted upon by Socrates, may not alter the behavior of outright tyrants, too far gone down the path of licentiousness to worry about the retributions of an afterlife.
Utilizing an instructive, albeit inelegant, penumbra cast by political despots, dictators, and strongmen, it warns against excessive deference, overconfidence, and licentiousness in boardrooms and executive suites.
These have been invoked, with varying degrees of licentiousness, in countless Israeli disputes, from 1967 to the present, over the establishment and also demolition of settlements beyond the Green Line.
While the French had among Americans a reputation for licentiousness, French families, especially in the interwar years, had to be convinced that American girls in the Smith College program were not too morally loose.
In the final chapter, "Contesting the Boundaries of Enclosure," Strocchia takes on the ever popular topic of nuns' imagined licentiousness and the challenges of claustration.
The licentiousness of the Arab Other is sickly, diseased and in need of a medical intervention, but one that is stronger than enteroclysis, one that could contain the spread of both turco miasma and turco genes.
The overall impression is that Shakespeare's plays luridly promote a general attitude of licentiousness.
Paul's argument for decriminalizing drugs is not a case for licentiousness or moral indifference to drug abuse.
Badir argues further that this new Reformed version of Mary's psychomachia, in its attempt to represent Mary's conversion from licentiousness to sober piety as a triumph of Protestant iconoclasm ultimately fails because it "inadvertently reinstates the power of the very image she was designed to repudiate" (27).
flirtation and kissing and drink-fueled licentiousness.