libel

(redirected from libels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to libels: slander, defaming

libel

[lī′bəl]
Etymology: L, libellus, little book
a false accusation written, printed, or typewritten, or presented in a picture or a sign that is made with malicious intent to defame the reputation of a person who is living or the memory of a person who is dead, resulting in public embarrassment, contempt, ridicule, or hatred.

libel

(lī′bĕl) [L. libellus, little book, pamphlet]
Defaming the character of another by means of the written word. To qualify legally as libel, written communication must intentionally impugn the reputation of another person and be both malicious and demonstrably false.

libel (lī´bəl),

n 1. that which is written and published in order to injure the character of another by ridicule or contempt.
2. a defamation expressed by print, writing, pictures, or signs.
References in classic literature ?
It might truly be said of him, as for many journalists in authority, that his most familiar emotion was one of continuous fear; fear of libel actions, fear of lost advertisements, fear of misprints, fear of the sack.
He mixed up the first murderer with quite the wrong murder, and capped his mistake in the next breath with an intolerable libel on the very pearl of our particular tribe.
I say, the most ungentlemanly trick a man can be guilty of is to come among the members of his profession with innovations which are a libel on their time-honored procedure.
You're nothing but a good pup, and the man who put the hyaeno in your name ought to be sued for libel.
Terror turned your heart to water," he replied; "and shame your tongue to libel.
The extracts from my son's Diary are a libel on his character," she said.
in the third voyage the cynical contempt is unspeakably painful, and from the distorted libel on mankind in the
Those who have sufficient power usually imprison or put to death any one who tries to shake their faith in their own excellence or in that of the universe; it is for this reason that seditious libel and blasphemy have always been, and still are, criminal offences.
Being indicted for the libel, and (after various strange demonstrations in court) found guilty, he fled into Holland in place of appearing to receive sentence: from whence, as the quiet burgomasters of Amsterdam had no relish for his company, he was sent home again with all speed.
If he were really not in the habit of drinking rather more than was exactly good for him, he might have brought action against his countenance for libel, and have recovered heavy damages.
Pickwick, he detailed the malicious libel of the Eatanswill INDEPENDENT, and the consequent excitement of their friend, the editor.
But in calling Moriarty a criminal you are uttering libel in the eyes of the law--and there lie the glory and the wonder of it